Africa

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Letter From,
Will McGrath

Earlier this month, embattled Lesotho Prime Minister Tom Thabane addressed a raucous crowd of supporters in the rural district of Mokhotlong. The trip was one of many in the final campaign push before the country’s upcoming special election, which was previously slated for 2017 and is now scheduled for February 28.

Comment, Mar/Apr 2015
James L. Gibson

Apartheid’s legacy of mistrust and prejudice has prevented South Africa from establishing a truly stable multiracial democracy. But increasing contact among the races and the emergence of a black middle class offer hope of reducing the role of race in national politics.

Snapshot,
Conor Seyle

Governments have traditionally combatted piracy with brute military force. More recently, however, states have opted for a different approach and seen surprising success.

Snapshot,
Kelly M. Greenhill

In Nigeria, the dispute over the number of casualties inflicted by Boko Haram—especially with its latest attack in Baga—has grown particularly acute in the lead-up to the country's now postponed elections.

Snapshot,
Seth Kaplan

Although the militant Islamist group Boko Haram has many features of a standard terrorist group, it is more helpful to consider it in another light: as a unique product of Nigeria’s unequal governance.

Letter From,
Jérôme Tubiana

In South Sudan's latest war, where alliances are made and broken at dizzying speed, there is little evidence that the recent ceasefire agreement will actually end the fighting.

Snapshot,
John Campbell

Americans tend to think of elections as the apex of democracy. But in some cases they are the opposite. In countries with weak democratic cultures and lax rule of law, elections can be destabilizing. Nigeria, which will hold elections next month, is a case in point.

Snapshot,
Joshua Meservey

Nairobi's use of extreme measures to fight terrorism is undermining its fledgling democracy.

Snapshot,
Robert Muggah

Fragile cities—places where government authority is crumbling and violence runs deep—will be the world's greatest challenge in the coming decades. But turning such cities around is possible. Here's how. 

Snapshot,
Emmanuel D'Harcourt

Ebola’s reputation is fearsome. Its horrifying symptoms, quick human-to-human transmission, and exotic locale seem ready-made for a thriller movie. Indeed, in the midst of the largest Ebola virus outbreak ever, a real-time script is emerging. There’s just one problem: the story is at best incomplete and at worst outright wrong

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