Africa

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Postscript,
Matt Mossman

Nigeria’s election may have ended with a winner and a loser, but it was more about the process than the candidates. And there, great gains were made.

Snapshot,
Tom Keatinge

Roughly $1.3 billion in remittances flow to Somalia every year. But heavy-handed regulation threatens to cut off this vital flow of money.

Snapshot,
Jonathan Zimmerman

Since the 1960s, Americans have split into two camps on sex education: one side wants to teach kids how to make choices about sex, and the other wants to teach them to avoid it. That’s not an issue in most parts of the developing world, where the idea of youth as sexual decision-makers is simply anathema.

Snapshot,
Matt Mossman

It is clearer than ever that democracy in Nigeria is a rather thin veneer. Even so, a couple of factors make the country particularly fertile ground for democracy.

Snapshot,
Maria Eriksson Baaz, Didier Gondola, Esther Marijnen, Judith Verweijen, Paul Katembo Vikanza, Koen Vlassenroot, Tatiana Carayannis, Kevin Dunn, James Fairhead, Stephan Hochleithner, Chrispin Mvano, Eric Mwamba, and Blaise Muhire

The Oscar-nominated film Virunga omits crucial aspects of the park's violent colonial origins and marginalizes Congolese voices.

Snapshot,
Vito Laterza and Patience Mususa

Zambia is managing a boom in its copper mining industry and is on the verge of repaying its international debts. Political uncertainty following President Michael Sata's death, however, could unravel the country's progress.

Letter From,
Will McGrath

Earlier this month, embattled Lesotho Prime Minister Tom Thabane addressed a raucous crowd of supporters in the rural district of Mokhotlong. The trip was one of many in the final campaign push before the country’s upcoming special election, which was previously slated for 2017 and is now scheduled for February 28.

Comment, Mar/Apr 2015
James L. Gibson

Apartheid’s legacy of mistrust and prejudice has prevented South Africa from establishing a truly stable multiracial democracy. But increasing contact among the races and the emergence of a black middle class offer hope of reducing the role of race in national politics.

Snapshot,
Conor Seyle

Governments have traditionally combatted piracy with brute military force. More recently, however, states have opted for a different approach and seen surprising success.

Snapshot,
Kelly M. Greenhill

In Nigeria, the dispute over the number of casualties inflicted by Boko Haram—especially with its latest attack in Baga—has grown particularly acute in the lead-up to the country's now postponed elections.

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