Africa

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Snapshot,
Brahma Chellaney

East Africa is one of the world’s most water-stressed regions. Overexploitation of water resources there has been compounded by declining snowpacks on Mount Kilimanjaro and Mount Kenya. In this light, the discovery of two significant aquifers in mostly arid Kenya has been hailed as a potential game changer.

Interview, May/June 2014
Paul Kagame

Rwanda's president speaks with Foreign Affairs about the 1994 genocide, his 11-year stint in office, and his country's political future.

Essay, May/June 2014
Swanee Hunt

It would be obscene to say that the genocide in Rwanda had even the thinnest silver lining. But it did create a natural -- or unnatural -- experiment, as the country’s social, economic, and political institutions were wiped out. In important respects, the reconstructed Rwanda is a dramatically different country, especially for women.

Snapshot,
John Prendergast

Africa's bloodiest conflicts are not new, but they have never been more linked than they are today. Traditional peacemaking efforts have largely failed to grapple with that reality.

Letter From,
Vivian Salama

Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni calls the country's recently discovered oil reserves "my oil" and has pushed a major new refinery project to shore up his presidency for life.

Snapshot,
Bhaskar Chakravorti, Jianwei Dong, Kate Fedosova

European corporations have an important competitive advantage in many emerging markets: a legacy of colonialism that provides cultural, linguistic, and political ties. The fact that the United States has no such legacy is a liability as U.S. firms try to catch up to their European competitors and seize new opportunities in the world’s fastest-growing economies.

Comment, Mar/Apr 2014
Jake Kendall and Rodger Voorhies

Most of the world’s poor lack a basic savings account, but the humble cell phone may change all that. Thanks to mobile finance, banks can now offer critical services to more people and in more places than ever before, helping them escape poverty for good.

Interview, Mar/Apr 2014
Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala

Nigeria's finance minister speaks with Foreign Affairs about the developing world's role in international financial institutions, the fight against corruption, and her mother's politically motivated kidnapping.

Letter From,
Alexander Wooley

The Tanzanian government hopes to turn the inefficient port of Dar es Salaam into a major regional trade hub, catapulting Tanzania into the global ranks of middle-income countries. But traveling the traffic-clogged roads that take the port's imports to the rest of the country, it is clear that the government has a lot of work to do.

Snapshot,
Alexander Kasterine

Wildlife trade bans are failing because they have run into the same basic problem as the war on drugs. Prohibitions on trading wildlife products such as tusks and timber have ultimately made them more valuable. And criminal organizations have moved in and taken over the market.

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