Africa

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Interview, Mar/Apr 2014
Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala

Nigeria's finance minister speaks with Foreign Affairs about the developing world's role in international financial institutions, the fight against corruption, and her mother's politically motivated kidnapping.

Letter From,
Alexander Wooley

The Tanzanian government hopes to turn the inefficient port of Dar es Salaam into a major regional trade hub, catapulting Tanzania into the global ranks of middle-income countries. But traveling the traffic-clogged roads that take the port's imports to the rest of the country, it is clear that the government has a lot of work to do.

Snapshot,
Alexander Kasterine

Wildlife trade bans are failing because they have run into the same basic problem as the war on drugs. Prohibitions on trading wildlife products such as tusks and timber have ultimately made them more valuable. And criminal organizations have moved in and taken over the market.

Snapshot,
Vish Sakthivel

By asserting itself in security and counterterrorism operations in North Africa, including by supporting French intervention in Mali, Morocco gained an advantage in its battle with Algeria for regional clout.

Snapshot,
Peter Eichstaedt

Joseph Kony is many things -- a megalomaniac, a self-proclaimed prophet, a witch doctor, a ruthless and paranoid commander. But above all, he is a survivor.

Snapshot,
Marc F. Bellemare

Economic development has come to mean too many things -- so many things, in fact, that it now mostly serves to harm the world’s poor.

Snapshot,
Alex de Waal and Abdul Mohammed

The ongoing turmoil in South Sudan could give the country's leaders a much-needed opportunity to reset the national agenda. They cannot afford to squander this moment, and their first task is a sober appraisal of what has gone so disastrously wrong.

Snapshot,
Ryan Irwin

Nelson Mandela lived one of the great lives of the twentieth century: he was an international icon who brought democratic rule and human rights to South Africa. But to thrive in the twenty-first century, the country needs not hope and activism but technocrats and engineers who can develop workable solutions to the messy realities of urban blight and rural poverty.

Snapshot,
William McCants

A civil war has broken out within al Qaeda, largely because its leader, Ayman al-Zawahiri, has tried to expand the movement too broadly. As al Qaeda affiliates open new fronts in the global jihad, they often disagree about who should call the shots.

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