Africa

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Snapshot,
Isobel Coleman and Sigrid von Wendel

Boko Haram, whose name roughly translates to “secular education is a sin,” has been committing heinous attacks across Nigeria's north for years, frequently targeting schools. To fight back, Abuja must double down on education even as it rethinks its counterterrorism strategy.

Letter From,
Jérôme Tubiana

In April 2012, a small team of wandering miners discovered gold in the Jebel Amir hills of North Darfur, Sudan. One of the mines was so rich -- it reportedly brought millions of dollars to its owners -- that it was nicknamed “Switzerland.” Diggers rushed in from all over Sudan, bringing with them guns, gangs, and prostitutes.

Snapshot,
Jessica Hatcher

What’s particularly disturbing about the latest Ebola outbreak is that the United States has recently developed treatments for the disease. But, despite lobbying from scientists, the drugs have not been put to the test.

Snapshot,
Paul Hidalgo

Kenya is on its way to becoming the world’s next hotbed of extremism as a result of al Shabaab’s active and growing presence there. And so far, the Kenyan government has been its own worst enemy in attempting to reverse this trend.

Snapshot,
Ricardo Soares De Oliveira

The countries of East Africa are in the early throes of an oil boom, with an unprecedented opportunity for economic development. Unless they avoid the mistakes of those before them, though, the region's governments could easily squander it.

Snapshot,
David Malet

Foreign fighters might seem like a product of twenty-first-century warfare, but they are nothing new. Over the past two centuries, more than 70 insurgencies have successfully gone transnational. The patterns of recruitment for such disparate groups are broadly similar and, because of that, their campaigns all have the same Achilles’ heel.

Snapshot,
Brahma Chellaney

East Africa is one of the world’s most water-stressed regions. Overexploitation of water resources there has been compounded by declining snowpacks on Mount Kilimanjaro and Mount Kenya. In this light, the discovery of two significant aquifers in mostly arid Kenya has been hailed as a potential game changer.

Interview, May/June 2014
Paul Kagame

Rwanda's president speaks with Foreign Affairs about the 1994 genocide, his 11-year stint in office, and his country's political future.

Essay, May/June 2014
Swanee Hunt

It would be obscene to say that the genocide in Rwanda had even the thinnest silver lining. But it did create a natural -- or unnatural -- experiment, as the country’s social, economic, and political institutions were wiped out. In important respects, the reconstructed Rwanda is a dramatically different country, especially for women.

Snapshot,
John Prendergast

Africa's bloodiest conflicts are not new, but they have never been more linked than they are today. Traditional peacemaking efforts have largely failed to grapple with that reality.

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