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Snapshot,
Alan Greenspan

In today's world of fiat currencies and floating exchange rates, a return to the gold standard seems to be nowhere on anybody’s horizon. Yet gold still has special properties that no other currency can claim -- which is why China is boosting its holdings.

Snapshot,
Paul K. MacDonald and Joseph M. Parent

The Obama administration's war against ISIS is entirely consistent with its previous efforts to limit U.S. foreign policy entanglements. Indeed, Washington's strategy is cribbed straight from the retrenchment handbook.

Review Essay,
Daniel Falkiner

The new book A Troublesome Inheritance confirms that the basic biological facts of race and human evolution are indisputable. But at certain moments, the book ceases to be a scientific inquiry into race and becomes something far more troubling.

Snapshot,
Gregory Clark

The United States cherishes an image of itself as a country that invites in the world’s tired, its poor, and its huddled masses. In reality, the country isn't capable of transforming the life opportunities of disadvantaged populations.

Snapshot,
Mary L. Dudziak

As the turmoil in Ferguson unfolds, questions about the United States' commitment to human rights are once more headlining news coverage around the world. That should not be surprising. American racial inequality regularly dominated foreign news coverage during the 1950s and 1960s. And U.S. policymakers were eventually forced to respond, in part to protect the United States' image abroad.

Comment, SEPT/OCT 2014
Michael Tomasky

Divisions among Democrats exist just like they do among Republicans, but have largely festered beneath the surface for lack of a spokesperson to challenge the party’s economic elites. In Elizabeth Warren, grassroots Democrats may have found their champion.

Comment, SEPT/OCT 2014
Byron York

A loose confederation of conservative thinkers and politicians is developing a new strategy for reaching out to the American middle class. These reformers could save the Republican Party -- if only they could win over their fellow conservatives.

Comment, SEPT/OCT 2014
Gideon Rose and Jonathan Tepperman

American politics today are a mess, and since the distraction and paralysis of the world’s hegemon has such obvious global significance, we decided to turn our focus inward, exploring the sources and contours of the American malaise.

Comment, SEPT/OCT 2014
David Frum

Three big trends -- a growing reliance on older voters, an extremist ideological turn, and an increasing internal rigidity -- have changed the Republican Party over the past decade, weakening its ability to win presidential elections and inhibiting its ability to govern.

Comment, SEPT/OCT 2014
Yascha Mounk

The Tea Party and its European cousins have emerged from the enduring inability of democratic governments to satisfy their citizens’ needs. Today’s populist movements won’t subside until the legitimate grievances driving them have been addressed.

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