South America

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Snapshot,
Stacie L. Pettyjohn

Last month, Washington pledged to give up control of ICANN, a nonprofit that manages the Internet's domain name system. Critics say the move will empower repressive regimes to restrict Internet freedom. But it actually provides the best chance of preserving an open system.

Letter From,
Boris Muñoz

Like his successor, Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro tends to blame his country's violence problem on inequality. Yet if the government has made significant progress reducing inequality, and if, as Hugo Chávez believed, violence is derived from social injustice, what explains the recent surge in crime?

Snapshot,
Bhaskar Chakravorti, Jianwei Dong, Kate Fedosova

European corporations have an important competitive advantage in many emerging markets: a legacy of colonialism that provides cultural, linguistic, and political ties. The fact that the United States has no such legacy is a liability as U.S. firms try to catch up to their European competitors and seize new opportunities in the world’s fastest-growing economies.

Snapshot,
Eduardo J. Gómez

By some measures, the BRICS have squandered their years of plenty. Even as they poured money into building dynamic economies and gaining global power, they neglected to invest in their own populations. Another group of nations -- Mexico, Colombia, and Singapore -- has struck a better balance and, as a result, makes a better model than the BRICS for other emerging economies.

Snapshot,
Boris Muñoz

Throughout the fall, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro's party looked set to lose this weekend's local elections -- and big time. But then, he forced private stores to slash prices and urged the public to empty their shelves. That will probably be enough to hand his party a victory, but it might not ensure Maduro's political survival in the long term.

Snapshot,
Rodrigo Tavares

Thanks to globalization, city and state governments can no longer fulfill their social, political, and economic responsibilities without interacting with the world. That is why they are developing their own foreign policies and mustering resources to protect their interests abroad.

Snapshot,
Malcolm Beith

In reshaping the war on drugs to support the war on terrorism, the United States has found a better way to fight both.

Response,
Harriet Lamb

The CEO of Fairtrade International responds to criticism that the fair trade movement has done too little to help the poor.

Snapshot,
Anne Phillips

For a little under a year, the Colombian government and the FARC have been holding peace talks in Havana. Two Colombian government negotiators, a prominent opposition member of the Venezuelan National Assembly, a former Cuban diplomat, and two demobilized fighters offer their takes on the negotiations. Their hopefulness about the process varies, but all warn of regional instability should talks fail.

Snapshot,
Emma Sokoloff-Rubin

The massive protests of the past few weeks have demonstrated how deeply Brazilians feel the right to speak out against their government. But just 30 years ago, the country was ruled by a brutal dictatorship that blocked free expression. A group of young playwrights sought to change that.

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