South America

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Snapshot,
Kathryn Hochstetler

Rousseff seems likely to remain in office—but one might reasonably wonder why anyone would want to want to be at the helm in Brazil for what will be a number of bumpy years.

Snapshot,
Robert Gay

Brazilian prisons were createdand are run bydrug cartels. An inmate who became a leader of a criminal faction tells his story.

Snapshot,
Paolo Spada and Hollie Russon Gilman

At a time of record low trust in public institutions, thousands of new channels for citizen involvement in government are opening across the world. They go further than electoral participation; they increase citizens’ ability to monitor, regulate, and, in some cases, directly affect political decision-making.

Snapshot,
Christopher Sabatini

Cheap oil is generating headaches for Latin American countries that bet on high prices. Here's how Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela are managing the downturn. 

Snapshot,
Kathryn Sikkink and Bridget Marchesi

In December 2014, Brazil’s National Truth Commission completed what may be Latin America’s last major investigation into human rights abuses during the twentieth century. The report names names and calls for prosecutions, but whether its findings will lead to justice for the victims remains an open question.

Snapshot,
Robert Muggah

Fragile cities—places where government authority is crumbling and violence runs deep—will be the world's greatest challenge in the coming decades. But turning such cities around is possible. Here's how. 

Letter From,
Nathaniel Parish Flannery
The wave of antigovernment protests sweeping Mexico was set off by the disappearance and presumed deaths of 43 college students. But the real reasons for people's anger lie deeper.

Snapshot,
Kathryn Hochstetler

In her victory speech on Sunday night, Rousseff promised to reform politics, combat corruption, and rejuvenate the industrial economy. Most Brazilians, including her opponents' supporters, probably do want those things, but it will be even harder for Rousseff to deliver them in her second term than it was in the first.

Snapshot,
J. P. Singh

Earlier this month, Brazil and the United States struck a landmark trade agreement over a longtime point of contention: cotton. The deal—the United States pays a hefty sum to Brazilian cotton farmers in return for an opportunity to continue subsidizing its own producers—concealed an ugly truth about the misbalance of power in international trade.

Snapshot,
Peter Wilson

Venezuela's top military officers, longtime allies of Hugo Chávez, have consolidated their power under his embattled successor, Nicolás Maduro, and deepened the cracks in the regime.

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