South America

Refine By:
Snapshot,
Kathryn Hochstetler

In her victory speech on Sunday night, Rousseff promised to reform politics, combat corruption, and rejuvenate the industrial economy. Most Brazilians, including her opponents' supporters, probably do want those things, but it will be even harder for Rousseff to deliver them in her second term than it was in the first.

Snapshot,
J. P. Singh

Earlier this month, Brazil and the United States struck a landmark trade agreement over a longtime point of contention: cotton. The deal—the United States pays a hefty sum to Brazilian cotton farmers in return for an opportunity to continue subsidizing its own producers—concealed an ugly truth about the misbalance of power in international trade.

Snapshot,
Peter Wilson

Venezuela's top military officers, longtime allies of Hugo Chávez, have consolidated their power under his embattled successor, Nicolás Maduro, and deepened the cracks in the regime.

Interview, SEPT/OCT 2014
Jim Yong Kim

The World Bank's president talks to Foreign Affairs about fighting inequality, his reform program, and who should succeed him.

Response, SEPT/OCT 2014
Peter Kornbluh; Jack Devine

Kornbluh asserts that, contrary to Devine's interpretation of events, the CIA never gave up on the goal of pushing Chilean President Salvador Allende from power and played a significant role in Allende's demise; Devine stands by his account.

Snapshot,
Lauren Carasik

In theory, Honduras' new charter cities are supposed to spur widespread economic growth by allowing free enterprise to circumvent the country’s weak political institutions. In practice, they seem likely to benefit only Honduras’ existing economic and political elites.

Snapshot,
Christopher Sabatini

Latin America’s new regional groups claim to share lofty goals, from resolving conflicts to coordinating political and economic policies. But there is little reason to believe that they are capable of achieving them.

Video,
Gideon Rose and Jack Devine

Gideon Rose, editor of Foreign Affairs, sits down with Jack Devine, a former CIA operations officer, to get his take on U.S. involvement in Chile, the role of covert action in U.S. foreign policy, and Putin's playbook in Ukraine.

Snapshot,
William Michael Schmidli

The ubiquity of human rights rhetoric in American political life today obscures the relatively recent origins of the U.S. human rights movement. It wasn’t until the late 1960s and the 1970s that grassroots organizers, lobbyists, and members of Congress embraced human rights in reaction to the excesses of America's Cold War policies.

Comment, JUL/AUG 2014
Jack Devine

The 1973 coup in Chile is often included in indictments of U.S. covert action during the Cold War, during which the United States, at the direction of a number of presidents, sometimes took actions of questionable wisdom to prevent or reverse the rise of leftists who Washington feared might lead their countries into the Soviet orbit. In truth, the CIA did not plot with the Chilean military to overthrow Allende.

Syndicate content