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Comment, Jan/Feb 2015
Gideon Rose

Entrepreneurs drive innovation and dynamism, which in turn drive growth. So our lead package explores entrepreneurialism today—what it involves, what it accomplishes, and what can be done to spur and profit from it.

Interview, Jan/Feb 2015
Jeff Bezos

Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon, talks to Foreign Affairs about American competitiveness, creative disruption, and why he runs into the office every morning.

Interview, Jan/Feb 2015
Michael Moritz

Venture capitalist Michael Moritz talks to Foreign Affairs about predicting success, investing globally, and why Google’s original business model was a failure.

Interview, Jan/Feb 2015
Niklas Zennstrom

Niklas Zennstrom, founder of Skype, talks to Foreign Affairs about the sharing economy, why start-ups are thriving in Europe, and how technology can address climate change.

Review Essay, Jan/Feb 2015
James Surowiecki

In recent decades, most innovation has come from a single sector (information technology) and a single place (Silicon Valley). Walter Isaacson’s The Innovators and Peter Thiel’s Zero to One shed light on how that happened and what drives innovation more generally.

Snapshot,
Nimmi Gowrinathan

Most of the recent Senate report on the CIA’s use of torture after 9/11 is gruesomely detailed. But one thing is missing: the stories of the women who we know were in U.S. custody and may well have been subject to degrading treatment as well.

Snapshot,
Milosz Reterski

In defending its vital interests in the Arctic, the United States lacks a critical tool: mighty nuclear-powered icebreakers that would solidify its economic and strategic role in the region. Russia is surging ahead in this area, and the United States must catch up.   

Interview, Jan/Feb 2015
Marcelo Claure

Marcelo Claure, founder of BrightStar and CEO of Sprint, talks to Foreign Affairs about how to run a corporation like an entrepreneur and bringing soccer to the United States. 

Letter From,
Nathaniel Parish Flannery
The wave of antigovernment protests sweeping Mexico was set off by the disappearance and presumed deaths of 43 college students. But the real reasons for people's anger lie deeper.

Snapshot,
Ralph H. Espach

The Peña Nieto government seems to be facing its worst crisis yet, one likely to persist as police clash with a small minority of protestors who attack property, set fires, and throw Molotov cocktails. The breadth of the public outrage, however, is uncertain, and the movement has no clearly defined, practical demands.

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