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Snapshot,
Christopher Sabatini

Cheap oil is generating headaches for Latin American countries that bet on high prices. Here's how Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela are managing the downturn. 

Snapshot,
Michael T. Klare

The debate over whether U.S. interests abroad are better served by hard power or soft power is perennial. Now there is a third option—energy power—about which Democrats and Republicans seem to agree.

Snapshot,
Hervé Rakoto Razafimbahiny

Haiti is at risk of returning to a dangerous cycle of coups and conflict unless the country and the international community work together to tackle the root of the instability: bad governance, corruption, widespread poverty, and inept foreign intervention.

Snapshot,
Janine Davidson

The president’s second National Security Strategy articulates a belief in a peaceful, rules-based international order; it also reaffirms the fact that none of this can happen without the leadership of the United States.

Snapshot,
Kathryn Sikkink and Bridget Marchesi

In December 2014, Brazil’s National Truth Commission completed what may be Latin America’s last major investigation into human rights abuses during the twentieth century. The report names names and calls for prosecutions, but whether its findings will lead to justice for the victims remains an open question.

Snapshot,
Ali Wyne

The strategy behind the U.S. pivot to Asia has a missing link: a stronger role in Latin America.

Snapshot,
Humera Khan

Traditionally, countering violent extremism has been limited to military and government-led counterterrorism efforts that have ignored the crucial role of civil society in preventing radicalization.

Snapshot,
Jose W. Fernandez and Eric Lorber

Easing the U.S. embargo on Cuba will provide companies with immediate economic opportunities, so long as they are willing to bear the administrative and bureaucratic burdens of conducting business in a nation untouched by U.S. industry for 54 years.

Snapshot,
Kassia Yanosek and David G. Victor

Low oil prices could force some oil and gas producers to stop drilling. But the price slump may also create a sizable opportunity for new oil exploration projects, such as deep-water oil and gas fields, which have long lead times and do not rely solely on today’s oil prices.

Snapshot,
Jonathan Schlefer

It is hard to reconcile Peña Nieto’s status as person of the year and gangster in chief. But, as a symbol of the Mexican state, he is indeed both. And, strange as it may seem, both aspects of state power derive from St. Thomas Aquinas’ medieval ideal of governance.

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