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Snapshot,
Timothy H. Edgar

Since 2013, when Edward Snowden revealed that the NSA had been spying on private communications on a mass scale, U.S. President Barack Obama has faced pressure to tighten privacy laws. The administration has made more progress than many think.

Snapshot,
Juan de Onis

Some argue that Chile is living through the worst political crisis since the 1973 overthrow of President Salvador Allende. That is certainly exaggerated. Chile’s democracy under Bachelet is not at risk. Even so, finding a solution to corruption will not be easy.

Snapshot,
William M. LeoGrande

The State Department's recent recommendation that Obama take Cuba off the list of state sponsors of international terrorism removes a major roadblock to the re-establishment of diplomatic relations between Washington and Havana. If Obama acts on the recommendation, he will significantly strengthen Washington's diplomatic position in Cuba and Latin America more broadly.

Snapshot,

We poll experts on whether they think Congress should grant U.S. President Barack Obama trade promotion authority for the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Snapshot,
Farshad Ghodoosi

The historic negotiations between P5+1 countries and Iran over Tehran's nuclear aspirations are a diplomatic breakthrough. Whether any future agreements will be subject to international law, however, remains to be seen.

Snapshot,
Lauren Carasik

Washington’s harsh rhetoric in the sanctions against key Venezuelan political figures was counterproductive and will damage the United States’ regional credibility.

Snapshot,
Michael Shifter

U.S. sanctions against Venezuela were met with controversy not because of whom they targeted, but rather due to language that could help bolster President Nicolás Maduro's wavering control over the nation.

Video,
Stuart Reid and Brian Warshay

Bloomberg Analyst Brian Warshay discusses his recent article "Upgrading the Grid" with Foreign Affairs Deputy Managing Editor Stuart Reid.

Snapshot,
Kathryn Hochstetler

Rousseff seems likely to remain in office—but one might reasonably wonder why anyone would want to want to be at the helm in Brazil for what will be a number of bumpy years.

Snapshot,
Robert Gay

Brazilian prisons were createdand are run bydrug cartels. An inmate who became a leader of a criminal faction tells his story.

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