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Video,
Stuart Reid and Brian Warshay

Bloomberg Analyst Brian Warshay discusses his recent article "Upgrading the Grid" with Foreign Affairs Deputy Managing Editor Stuart Reid.

Snapshot,
Kathryn Hochstetler

Rousseff seems likely to remain in office—but one might reasonably wonder why anyone would want to want to be at the helm in Brazil for what will be a number of bumpy years.

Snapshot,
Robert Gay

Brazilian prisons were createdand are run bydrug cartels. An inmate who became a leader of a criminal faction tells his story.

Response,
Jonathan Schlefer

In my article, I tried to dissect how the Mexican state can be so successful in some dimensions and so troubled in others, with an aim toward suggesting a way to a better future. That, rather than nit picking, should be the pursuit of all observers of Mexico.

Snapshot,
Paolo Spada and Hollie Russon Gilman

At a time of record low trust in public institutions, thousands of new channels for citizen involvement in government are opening across the world. They go further than electoral participation; they increase citizens’ ability to monitor, regulate, and, in some cases, directly affect political decision-making.

Snapshot,
Christopher Sabatini

Cheap oil is generating headaches for Latin American countries that bet on high prices. Here's how Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela are managing the downturn. 

Snapshot,
Michael T. Klare

The debate over whether U.S. interests abroad are better served by hard power or soft power is perennial. Now there is a third option—energy power—about which Democrats and Republicans seem to agree.

Snapshot,
Hervé Rakoto Razafimbahiny

Haiti is at risk of returning to a dangerous cycle of coups and conflict unless the country and the international community work together to tackle the root of the instability: bad governance, corruption, widespread poverty, and inept foreign intervention.

Snapshot,
Janine Davidson

The president’s second National Security Strategy articulates a belief in a peaceful, rules-based international order; it also reaffirms the fact that none of this can happen without the leadership of the United States.

Snapshot,
Kathryn Sikkink and Bridget Marchesi

In December 2014, Brazil’s National Truth Commission completed what may be Latin America’s last major investigation into human rights abuses during the twentieth century. The report names names and calls for prosecutions, but whether its findings will lead to justice for the victims remains an open question.

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