East Asia

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Snapshot,
Stephen Hadley and Paul Haenle

U.S. leaders should not dismiss Chinese President Xi Jinping’s proposal to build a “new type of major-country relations” out of hand if Xi is willing to remove the proposition's references to core interests.

Snapshot,
Van Jackson

Russia tends to make diplomatic overtures to North Korea whenever relations between Moscow and Washington sour. With U.S. strategy in Asia hanging in the balance, though, the repercussions of a stronger Russian-North Korean partnership could be different than ever before.

Snapshot,
Clarissa Sebag-Montefiore

In China, the overwhelming cultural pressure for women to marry by the age of 27—especially intense around Chinese New Year—has led to a burgeoning rent-a-boyfriend industry.

Postscript,
Salvatore Babones

It has been clear for a long time that China's rate of economic growth would eventually decelerate for a number of reasons.

Snapshot,
Evan A. Feigenbaum

As Asian countries increasingly rely on one another for trade, investment, and other economic public goods, Washington risks ceding leadership and missing opportunities by tilting at ideas whose trajectory it cannot easily halt and whose historical and ideological roots run deep.

Snapshot,
Jung-Chul Lee and Inwook Kim

Recent hacking aside, Pyongyang has been softening its tone for some time now—a possible sign that it is ready to return to the negotiating table.

Snapshot,
Michael Kofman

China might seem like a winner in Russia’s clash with the West over Ukraine, but the conflict has not left Beijing unscathed.

Snapshot,
Matthew Goodman and Ely Ratner

Nearly two centuries after it lost its traditional place at the center of Asian affairs, Beijing has begun giving shape and substance to its renewed leadership on the regional stage.

Snapshot,
Jonathan Woetzel and Jeongmin Seong

With 632 million Internet users, China has already become the world’s largest e-tailing market, with almost $300 billion in sales posted in 2013. Although digital marketplaces have changed the face of Chinese retail, however, other major sectors such as manufacturing and healthcare have been much slower to embrace the Internet. China’s digital transformation is just beginning, which means that over the next few years, the world’s second-largest economy will radically transform the way it does business.

Snapshot,
Catie Bailard

Everyone now knows that the Internet can facilitate mass protest movements. What tends to be overlooked, however, is the Internet's other role in political movements of this sort—that is, its effects before protestors ever take to the streets.

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