Northeast Asia

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Snapshot,
John Delury

The central lesson from North Korea is that even the best nuclear deal with Iran is merely a prelude to the real diplomatic drama. To ensure that Tehran does not go the way of Pyongyang, the nuclear accord must be followed by the creation of a framework for fundamentally new Iranian relations with the United States, the region, and the international community.

Snapshot,
Adam P. Liff and Andrew S. Erickson

Since September 2012, the waters and airspace surrounding the Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands in the East China Sea have become increasingly crowded. China is conducting more military and paramilitary operations, and Japan is scrambling fighter jets daily. The risk of an unintended low-level incident escalating to a crisis has reached new heights. Given this reality, the two sides urgently need effective bilateral crisis management mechanisms.

Letter From,
Devin Stewart

Working women have long struggled to make their way in Japan, even in comparison to their counterparts in other advanced countries. But now many Japanese companies are acting to change that on their own—a shift that could provide a much-needed boost to the country's economy.

Snapshot,
Jeffrey W. Hornung

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s recent electoral victory gave him some leeway to finally address the issue of comfort women, which plagues Japan’s relations with South Korea.

Snapshot,
Jacques E. C. Hymans

Many have warned that even if a Iran accepts a nuclear deal, it will continue to develop nuclear weapons in secret. In reality, however, Iran simply doesn't have the capability to build the bomb without getting caught.

Postscript,
Richard Katz

Abe’s economic revival is hardly going as planned. A consumption tax hike that he introduced in April triggered a recession over the following six months, prompting him to announce the delay of a second planned hike and to vow to dissolve the Japanese parliament.

Snapshot,
Suki Kim

In that relentless vacuum, nothing moved. No news came in or out. No phone calls, no emails, no letters, no ideas not prescribed by the regime. Thirty missionaries disguised as teachers and 270 male North Korean students and me, the sole writer disguised as a missionary disguised as a teacher. Locked in the prison disguised as a campus in an empty Pyongyang suburb, heavily guarded around the clock, all we had was one another.

Snapshot,
J. Berkshire Miller

After months of back-channel diplomacy, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Chinese leader Xi Jinping finally met this week on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in Beijing. The Abe-Xi meeting is long overdue and represents the first time the leaders from the world’s second and third biggest economies have talked since Abe took office in December 2012.

Essay, Nov/Dec 2014
Elizabeth C. Economy

Xi Jinping’s reforms are designed to produce a corruption-free, politically cohesive, and economically powerful one-party state with global reach: a Singapore on steroids. But there is no guarantee the reforms will be as transformative as the Chinese leader hopes.

Snapshot,
Robert A. Manning

As if the world didn’t have enough problems, North Korea seems to be gearing up to add a few more. According to the New York Times, commercial satellite imagery has confirmed that Pyongyang recently upgraded its main satellite launching facility, which will enable it to test an intercontinental missile.

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