Northeast Asia

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Snapshot,
Jennifer Lind

To protect its core interests in Asia, the United States should start being honest about the things it doesn't care about. That includes China's harassment of Philippine ships and its decision to fly aircraft over disputed islands.

Essay, 2014
Richard Katz

Shinzo Abe is trying to restore Japanese consumer confidence by boosting inflation. But confidence must rest on something more substantive: meaningful structural reforms to reverse Japanese companies’ lagging competitiveness. Otherwise, any temporary economic boost will soon give way to disillusion.

Snapshot,
John Osburg

China's communist reformers once sought to separate money and status from romance and marriage. But in recent years, the country's wave of new wealth has returned material considerations to the forefront of relations between the sexes. 

Snapshot,
Scott M. Moore

China’s environmental crisis, severe as it is, won’t bring down the communist regime -- its leaders are too clever to let that happen. Instead, they have carefully co-opted China’s growing environmental movement as their own, expanding their own power in the process.

Snapshot,
Roselyn Hsueh

A year ago this month, Beijing and Taipei signed a major trade deal that seemed to mark a breakthrough in relations. Yet many Taiwanese believe that the unequal terms of the agreement make plain what Beijing is really up to: regional domination.

Essay, 2014
Sue Mi Terry

Contrary to popular belief, the reunification of North Korea and South Korea would not spell disaster for South Korea, nor would it pose an unacceptable risk for the United States, China, and Japan. Rather, it would produce massive economic and social benefits for the peninsula and the region.

Snapshot,
Evan A. Feigenbaum and Damien Ma

For its broader reform project to succeed, China needs a new “federalism” -- a realignment of central and local government power -- that can adapt to the conditions of a rapidly changing economy.

Letter From,
Devin Stewart

For the past two decades, Tokyo has been described as stagnant, glacial, and arthritic. But that is only part of the story. Outside the government, a new generation of liberal reformers is bringing about real change.

Review Essay, May/June 2014
Margarita Estévez-Abe

David Pilling's useful book, Bending Adversity, takes a relatively hopeful view of the conservative nationalism advocated by Japanese president Shinzo Abe. But a more thorough accounting of Japan’s recent past and the country's political system would suggest a less sanguine outlook.

Snapshot,
J. Berkshire Miller

When U.S. President Barack Obama touches down in Asia later this month for a long-overdue trip, he will have a daunting challenge ahead of him: pushing Washington’s two major regional allies together.

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