Northeast Asia

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Snapshot,
J. Berkshire Miller

When U.S. President Barack Obama touches down in Asia later this month for a long-overdue trip, he will have a daunting challenge ahead of him: pushing Washington’s two major regional allies together.

Snapshot,
Gi-Wook Shin and Daniel C. Sneider

Disputes over wartime history between Japan and South Korea are proving a useful wedge for China to drive the two U.S. allies apart. As Obama heads to Asia this month, it is time for the United States to tackle wartime history in Asia head on.

Video,

Foreign Affairs Editor Gideon Rose moderates a discussion on the new emerging markets of Poland, South Korea, and Turkey.

Snapshot,
Kendrick Kuo

Beijing’s ambitious push to develop Xinjiang, a troubled region in western China, has failed to create stability there. In fact, it has only made things worse.

Snapshot,
Michael T. Klare

U.S. President Barack Obama must consider which priority in East Asia -- the credibility of the pivot or the avoidance of conflict -- is the most pressing and deal with it, since the risk of confrontation in the East China Sea will not go away anytime soon.

Video,

Editor Gideon Rose recently joined China experts Elizabeth Economy and Adam Segal to discuss "the Chinese dream at home and abroad."

Snapshot,
J. Berkshire Miller

Much of the alarmism over Japan’s new national security tilt is misplaced. A balanced interpretation must not dwell only on Abe’s personal views -- and his recent unhelpful visit to Yasukuni Shrine -- but also take into account what policies the country needs to be the United States’ prime ally in the region.

Postscript,
Richard Katz

When it comes to Japan, China seems torn. On security issues, it is increasingly hawkish. But on economic ties -- from Japanese imports to Japanese investments -- it has become downright dovish. At the heart of China’s reversal is the economic reality that China needs Japan just as much as Japan needs China.

Comment, Jan/Feb 2014
Marcus Noland

South Korea is a rich, technologically advanced, mature democracy with an impressive record of innovation, economic reform, and sound leadership, so to call it an emerging market is a bit of an anachronism. But the country’s chief economic virtue, its openness, also subjects it to greater market volatility and risk than its fully developed counterparts.

Snapshot,
Michael J. Green

Much of the coverage of China's recent announcement of a new Air Defense Identification Zone in the East China Sea contends that Beijing made a hasty move that the region can now correct with a little help from Washington. Unfortunately for the Obama administration, however, a little help won't be enough. It will need to firmly and consistently stick by its allies for the long haul.

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