India

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Snapshot,
Manjari Chatterjee Miller

Observers may blanch at the prospect of a Prime Minister Narendra Modi, whom they fear would apply his Hindu nationalist beliefs to Indian foreign policy. But they should remember that, for the past five decades, Indian foreign policy has been broadly consistent and any changes had little to do with the prime minister’s political ideology.

Video,
Gideon Rose and Robert Jervis

Gideon Rose, editor of Foreign Affairs, interviews Robert Jervis, professor of international politics at Columbia University.

Comment, 2014
Ira Trivedi

Last December, India's Supreme Court re-established a colonial era law prohibiting homosexual relations. That will mix poorly with an Indian society that has a long tradition of tolerance for sexual minorities.

Snapshot,
Milan Vaishnav

Heading into general elections this spring, Indian voters are worried about the economy -- no wonder, since the country's growth rate has fallen by nearly half since 2010, inflation remains high, and corruption is rampant. Unfortunately for voters, none of the leading parties have presented a coherent economic strategy.

Snapshot,
Sumit Ganguly

It is tempting to assume that India's upcoming national election will pit the forces of progressivism, embodied by the ruling Indian National Congress Party, against the forces of cultural and religious nationalism, represented by the Bharatiya Janata Party. In truth, both major parties have failed to live up to their platforms -- and voters know it. In the end, this spring's real winners might be the country's smaller regional parties.

Snapshot,
Ira Trivedi

In India, notions of dating and romance are transforming. More young people than ever expect to choose their own partners, but joblessness and other economic woes prevent them from taking control of their own lives. And that makes India’s sexual revolution a rather tense affair.

Review Essay, Nov/Dec 2013
Pankaj Mishra

According to the celebrated British historian Perry Anderson’s new book, India’s democracy is actually a sham. Anderson’s harsh Marxist critique is convincing in many ways, but undercut by his indifference to the distinctive characteristics of India’s politics and economy.

Essay, Sept/Oct 2013
Ruchir Sharma

Yes, India as a whole is slowing down. But the country’s most dynamic states -- under their very smart, albeit sometimes autocratic, leaders -- are still growing at or near double-digit rates, and represent India’s secret weapon for continuing to compete with the other major emerging markets.

Snapshot,
Milan Vaishnav

As recent protests indicate, Indians increasingly believe that their government is letting them down. New Delhi's faults -- criminalism, cronyism, and corruption -- are well known. Less understood is that these problems result from positive developments, that they will get worse before they get better, and that the solution is not less democracy, as some have suggested, but even more.

Comment, May/June 2013
Manjari Chatterjee Miller

The world may expect great things from India, but as extensive reporting reveals, Indians themselves turn out to be deeply skeptical about their country’s potential. That attitude, plus New Delhi’s dysfunctional foreign-policy bureaucracy, prevent long-term planning of the sort China has mastered -- and are holding India back.

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