Pakistan

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Snapshot,
Amjad Mahmood Khan

Pakistan's terrorism problem has its roots in a group of draconian laws—known as the blasphemy laws—that a military dictator, Zia ul-Haq, enacted decades ago.

Snapshot,
M.J. Akbar

Long before ISIS declared a caliphate in Iraq and Syria, Mahatma Gandhi gave Indian Muslims support for their Caliphate movement.

Snapshot,
C. Christine Fair

There is very little that Pakistan's prime minister could do now to contain the damage that the army and its two marionettes -- Qadri and Khan -- have already inflicted with massive protests.

Snapshot,
Sheba Saeed

In South Asia, few beggars work alone. They usually wind up attached to a network, either willingly or not. These networks are of often referred to as a “begging mafia,” perhaps because vulnerable adults and children living on the fringes of society are recruited to beg on the streets and give their earnings to their alleged patrons.

Snapshot,
Aqil Shah

In a recent speech before parliament, Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif claimed that terrorists would no longer be permitted to use Pakistan as a safe haven. The country's generals would second that, although who is -- and is not -- a terrorist ultimately remains subject to their interpretation.

Comment, JUL/AUG 2014
Harold H. Saunders

In 1971, the Pakistani government orchestrated a brutal military crackdown against the Bengali population in East Pakistan -- while the United States stuck by its ally Pakistan. Gary Bass's new book spotlights the “significant complicity” of U.S. President Richard Nixon and his national security adviser, Henry Kissinger, in this “forgotten genocide.”

Snapshot,
Aqil Shah

Even though they could be killed, Pakistani journalists have begun to break the long-standing taboo against publicly calling out the military for its misdeeds. The armed forces have fought back, and the more they do, the guiltier they seem.

Video,
Gideon Rose and Robert Jervis

Gideon Rose, editor of Foreign Affairs, interviews Robert Jervis, professor of international politics at Columbia University.

Snapshot,
Naheed Mustafa

The monolithic view in the West that all Pakistanis are enraged by drone strikes is inaccurate. In fact, further north -- closer to the areas that bear the brunt of the strikes -- it is not uncommon to encounter strong support for them.

Snapshot,
Heraldo Muñoz

Today, former Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf was indicted in the assassination of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto. The UN official who conducted the special investigation into her death recounts his own search for answers -- and why, he believes, most everyone is guilty.

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