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Snapshot,
Alexander Lebedev and Vladislav Inozemtsev

The world needs a new international convention to combat corruption -- a global epidemic that erodes government institutions, fuels unrest, and increasingly threatens the stability of the West.

Comment, Nov/Dec 2014
Richard K. Betts

After a decade-plus of war, the lessons for the United States are clear: fight fewer, more traditional wars and fight them more decisively. Above all, avoid getting entangled in the politics of chaotic countries.

Comment, Nov/Dec 2014
Peter Tomsen

More than 13 years after 9/11, the Afghan war is far from over, even if Washington insists that the U.S. role in it will soon come to an end. Three recent books help explain why, and what Washington needs to do next to protect the gains that have been made.

Essay, Nov/Dec 2014
Elizabeth C. Economy

Xi Jinping’s reforms are designed to produce a corruption-free, politically cohesive, and economically powerful one-party state with global reach: a Singapore on steroids. But there is no guarantee the reforms will be as transformative as the Chinese leader hopes.

Interview, Nov/Dec 2014
Joko Widodo

Indonesia’s new president talks to Foreign Affairs about his recent victory, his national agenda, and the threat of Islamic extremism.

Interview, Nov/Dec 2014
Benigno Aquino III

The president of the Philippines talks to Foreign Affairs about economic reform, political corruption, and Chinese aggression.

Response, Nov/Dec 2014
John Delury and Chung-in Moon; Sue Mi Terry

Contrary to what Terry claims, write Delury and Moon, the collapse of North Korea is a frightening prospect, and the sudden reunification of the Korean Peninsula would be disastrous. Terry replies.

Review Essay, Nov/Dec 2014
Michael Mandelbaum

According to Ian Morris, the author of a sweeping history of conflict from prehistoric times to the present, war can sometimes produce safety. But his account runs into difficulties as it approaches the present.

Snapshot,
Richard Javad Heydarian

As president, Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino III has managed to transform the Philippine economy and restore public trust in the state. Yet in recent months, the Aquino's political fortunes have taken a dramatic turn for the worse. 

Snapshot,
Shashank Joshi

The fate of the Middle East, home to roughly seven million Indians, has long been tied to that of India. Despite its stake in the region, however, India has remained passive in the face of crises. It appears wary of taking on a more assertive diplomatic or military role -- more likely to evacuate citizens than to send more in to grapple with the Middle East’s problems.

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