Asia

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Snapshot,
Clarissa Sebag-Montefiore

In China, the overwhelming cultural pressure for women to marry by the age of 27—especially intense around Chinese New Year—has led to a burgeoning rent-a-boyfriend industry.

Postscript,
Salvatore Babones

It has been clear for a long time that China's rate of economic growth would eventually decelerate for a number of reasons.

Snapshot,
Milan Vaishnav

On Monday, there was an earthquake in New Delhi. The shockwaves might have been electoral and the fallout political rather than human, but the repercussions were just as momentous.

Snapshot,
Matt Wheeler

The impeachment of former Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra threatens to derail more than her political career; it also imperils the military regime’s effort to suppress political discord.

Snapshot,
Evan A. Feigenbaum

As Asian countries increasingly rely on one another for trade, investment, and other economic public goods, Washington risks ceding leadership and missing opportunities by tilting at ideas whose trajectory it cannot easily halt and whose historical and ideological roots run deep.

Letter From,
Devin Stewart

Working women have long struggled to make their way in Japan, even in comparison to their counterparts in other advanced countries. But now many Japanese companies are acting to change that on their own—a shift that could provide a much-needed boost to the country's economy.

Snapshot,
Peter Martin

India has long seemed unable or unwilling to become a major player on the world stage. But the country’s prime minister, Narendra Modi, is looking to change all that. In order to compensate for a small and weak foreign service, he is tapping into India’s considerable soft power: its emigrants, intellectuals, and yogis.

Snapshot,
Vamsee Juluri

Whether Modi will usher in a Hindu renaissance, as his supporters hope, or contribute to the rise of Hindu nationalism, as his detractors warn, remains to be seen. For the moment, however, his words have been promising. 

Snapshot,
Jung-Chul Lee and Inwook Kim

Recent hacking aside, Pyongyang has been softening its tone for some time now—a possible sign that it is ready to return to the negotiating table.

Snapshot,
Eli Berman, Joseph H. Felter, Jacob N. Shapiro

Aid, investment, and job creation don't necessarily bring peace to conflict zones. In fact, aid often fuels violence. Policymakers need smarter development programs to minimize such unintended side effects.  

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