Turkey

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Essay, May/June 2014
Marina Ottaway and David Ottaway

Iraqi Kurdistan has achieved new prosperity by exporting its own oil and gas to Turkey, against the objections of Iraq’s central government. By challenging Baghdad’s claims to exclusive control of Iraq’s natural resources, the Kurds are showing how economic cooperation can make Middle Eastern borders more porous.

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Kemal Kirisci and Raj Salooja

Turkey has maintained a generous open-door policy for Syrian refugees. As Syrian refugees continue to pour into the country, Turkey must address their long-term status within its borders.

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Steven A. Cook

Watching Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan resort to increasingly authoritarian measures in recent months, many observers have called on President Abdullah Gul to step in. But that is unlikely to happen.

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Halil Karaveli

Last week, Erdogan banned Twitter to try to prevent the spread of recordings of incriminating conversations between him and members of his family and inner circle. By exposing the prime minister’s abuses of power, the dirty dealings of the Gülenists (Erdogan's foes and likely purveyors of the recordings), and the weakness of the opposition, the scandal raises doubts about the future of Turkish democracy.

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Tom Keatinge

Since 2011, FATF, the international body charged with developing policies to combat money laundering and terrorism financing, has had Turkey on its gray list of high-risk and non-cooperative jurisdictions. Here's why.

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Victor Gaetan

Gulen has tried to develop a genuinely modern school of Islam that reconciles the religion with liberal democracy, scientific rationalism, ecumenism, and free enterprise.

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Michael J. Koplow

As a U.S. ally, Turkey has been lacking for some time. But it is only recently that the United States has started to voice its displeasure. If Turkey’s sudden about-face on a number of issues is any indication, the Obama administration should have made getting tougher with Turkey a priority long ago.

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Halil Karaveli

In power for over a decade, Turkey's Islamists are proving to be their own worst enemy. The alliance of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s AKP and the movement of Fethullah Gülen, a Muslim cleric who leads his congregation from self-imposed exile in the United States, is imploding. As it does, the public is losing faith in both and the military is gearing up to insert itself into politics once more.

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Piotr Zalewski

Many market watchers were relieved when Turkey's central bank recently raised its lending rate. Turkey's prime minister was not one of them.

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Foreign Affairs Editor Gideon Rose moderates a discussion on the new emerging markets of Poland, South Korea, and Turkey.

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