Turkey

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Snapshot,
Aaron Stein

Turkey has long supported the terrorist group al-Nusra as a way to pressure the Assad regime. But there is no evidence to suggest that Turkey ever gave support to ISIS, once its leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, split from al-Nusra in 2013.

Snapshot,
Nick Danforth

Erdogan recently declared that, starting immediately, Turkish students would begin studying the Ottoman language in school. But for anyone who has ever struggled to learn the notoriously difficult Ottoman language—sometimes described as a practical joke played on historians—forcing it on a generation of schoolchildren might be the quickest way for Erdogan to destroy his popularity (and the Ottoman Empire’s as well).

Snapshot,
Gunes Murat Tezcur and Sabri Ciftci

The past few weeks have seen a wave of Muslims from all around the world joining the ranks of ISIS. Although most of the attention has been on those coming from the United States and Europe, the bulk of foreign fighters has actually come from places like Turkey, from which the flow of jihadists is particularly puzzling.

Snapshot,
Piotr Zalewski

Kurds have a right to take Turkey to task for its inaction in Kobani, just as Turks have a right to insist that Kurdish suffering in Syria does not give the PKK license to kill civilians or off-duty soldiers in Turkey.

Snapshot,
Nicholas Spiro

Fed policy is once again revealing which emerging markets have strengthened their defenses against a tightening in U.S. monetary policy and which remain vulnerable. For its part, Turkey is firmly in the latter camp.

Snapshot,
Halil Karaveli

Turkey has anticipated Assad’s downfall ever since protests first broke out in Syria in 2011. It has been disappointed at every turn, though, and now it is not only Assad who is in trouble but Turkey as well.

Snapshot,
Nick Danforth

Today, many in Turkey will celebrate Eid by purchasing sheep or cows, slaughtering them, and distributing the meat to the poor. Meanwhile, many members of Turkey’s self-consciously Western elite will participate in their own tradition: denouncing the whole thing as barbaric. Alongside these two basic positions, however, there are a host of more surprising arguments, many put forward by pro-sacrifice conservatives eager to claim the modernist high ground.

Snapshot,
Michael J. Koplow

The official view from Ankara might be sunny -- yet the clouds massing on the country’s border presage a domestic hurricane.

Snapshot,
Soner Cagaptay

Davutoglu’s foreign policy has dangerously exposed Turkey to regional threats, which will probably preoccupy him as he takes over the prime ministership.

Snapshot,
Elmira Bayrasli

In an election, coming in third place is rarely cause for celebration. But for Selahattin Demirtas, the charismatic and telegenic 41-year-old politician who ran in Turkey’s August 10 presidential election, it was. Nearly ten percent of Turkish voters cast their ballots for Demirtas, a Kurd.

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