Western Europe

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Snapshot,
Petr Polak

An energy union might give Europe more leverage over Russia’s gas monopoly, but it will also be difficult to implement without setting off a diplomatic energy battle between Poland and Germany.

Snapshot,
Arthur Goldhammer

Nicolas Sarkozy has just been elected head of UMP, the party he led before becoming president. Sarkozy hopes that the victory will give him a leg up in the battle to become France’s next president in 2017.

Snapshot,
Rory Miller

Tomorrow, the French National Assembly is set to vote on a resolution recognizing a Palestinian state. Although the act would be nonbinding, the vote is a referendum on whether France can follow through on its claim as the West's truest champion of the Palestinian cause.

Snapshot,
Lauren Harrison

Discussions of the Holocaust aside, Germany and Israel are still rarely mentioned in the same breath. Yet Berlin has long been one of the most successfuland secretiveintermediaries between Jerusalem and its enemies.

Snapshot,
Diego Muro

Madrid’s approach toward Catalonia has been needlessly adversarial. Rather than resist the region's aspirations, the Spanish government should welcome its commitment to a democratic process.

Snapshot,
David Schoenbaum

The opening to the West was announced almost inadvertently, just in time for the evening news, at what still passed for a routine press conference. Within hours, rivers of Trabis, the little cars with lawn mower engines that were an East German specialty, were flowing through the Wall. Crowds of West Berliners looked on, bemused as the dash for freedom morphed into a run on bananas.

Review Essay, Nov/Dec 2014
Gregory Fried

Scholars have long known that Martin Heidegger was a Nazi, but many doubted that his philosophy had anything to do with Hitler’s ideology. Now Peter Trawny, drawing on Heidegger’s hidden notebooks, argues that the philosopher’s anti-Semitism was deeply entwined with his ideas.

Snapshot,
Andrew Hammond

UKIP’s by-election victory and last month's Scottish referendum may seem unrelated. But they both reflect a change in British politics: a relatively stable two-party system is giving way to more unpredictability.

Snapshot,
Charles King

The United Kingdom has been saved -- for now. But last week's referendum marks the beginning, not the end, of a debate on the United Kingdom's constitutional order, its party system, its territorial configuration, and its relationship with Europe.

Snapshot,
Yascha Mounk

Europe’s political climate is more hostile to Jews now than at any time in recent memory. Rising anti-Semitism among Europe’s Muslims, especially in the wake of the war in Gaza, is one reason for this change. But to claim that the rise of Muslim anti-Semitism is the main culprit -- as the German journalist Jochen Bittner did this week in The New York Times -- is to overlook the role played by the European majority.

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