Western Europe

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Snapshot,
Yascha Mounk

Europe’s political climate is more hostile to Jews now than at any time in recent memory. Rising anti-Semitism among Europe’s Muslims, especially in the wake of the war in Gaza, is one reason for this change. But to claim that the rise of Muslim anti-Semitism is the main culprit -- as the German journalist Jochen Bittner did this week in The New York Times -- is to overlook the role played by the European majority.

Snapshot,
Carles Boix and J.C. Major

Over the past few years, the number of Catalans who wish for independence from Spain has skyrocketed. Until the early 2000s, a steady 10–15 percent supported independence. Now, according to recent opinion polls, that percentage is closer to 50 -- a symptom of deep-rooted flaws in the configuration of the Spanish state.

Snapshot,
Mark Blyth

Scottish independence could lead to economic disaster. But debates over national independence are seldom rational. Younger Scots aren't thinking about costs and uncertainties so much as the idea that a different future is possible.

Snapshot,
Jeremy Shapiro and Riccardo Alcaro

A good high representative can move the EU in the right direction, as long as he or she understands the subtleties of the role. With the support of skilled advisers, Mogherini can do just that, becoming the high representative the EU needs.

Comment, SEPT/OCT 2014
Yascha Mounk

The Tea Party and its European cousins have emerged from the enduring inability of democratic governments to satisfy their citizens’ needs. Today’s populist movements won’t subside until the legitimate grievances driving them have been addressed.

Snapshot,
Ivan Perkins

Political scientists have long argued that professional militaries provide the strongest bulwark against political upheavals and violent power struggles. But a closer look at the historical record leads to a different conclusion: stability is a product not of military virtues but the rule of law.

Letter From,
Hooman Majd

Vienna's opulent Palais Coburg was originally designed as a palace for Austria’s former Habsburg dynasty. But amid the tense negotiating sessions over the future of Iran's nuclear program, it could sometimes feel more like a prison -- for diplomats and journalists alike.

Snapshot,
Mitchell A. Orenstein

Out to earn a dollar on the Russian natural resource trade, European nations such as the Netherlands have long kept smiling as the Kremlin has continued to humiliate them. But now the airline disaster, combined with Moscow’s attempts to cover up its role in the tragedy, will likely force Europe to get real about its eastern neighbor.

Snapshot,
Jan-Werner Müller

The Europe of today is a creation of Christian Democrats. Yet both as a set of ideas and as a political movement, Christian democracy is growing less influential and less coherent. As the larger project of European integration faces new risks, then, its most important backer may soon prove incapable of defending it. 

Postscript,
R. Daniel Kelemen

Last Friday, EU leaders voted to nominate Jean-Claude Juncker as the next president of the European Commission. Juncker’s nomination constituted a major victory for the European Parliament and a humiliating defeat for British Prime Minister David Cameron.

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