Germany

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Snapshot,
Mitchell A. Orenstein

For a long time, France and Germany have had the most say over Europe's trajectory. But as the EU tries to move eastward, including to places like Ukraine, it is Germany and Russia that will decide who is in and who is out -- and under what terms.

Comment, Jan/Feb 2014
Mitchell A. Orenstein

Over the last 25 years, Poland has enjoyed peace, a booming economy, and integration with the rest of Europe. Behind that positive story lie smart economic reforms and the bond Poland formed with Europe’s leading economy, Germany.

Snapshot,
Jonathan Steinberg

Angela Merkel, elected to a third term as Germany's chancellor, is being typically reticent about her plans. But the smart money is on her forming a coalition with the Social Democrats.

Snapshot,
Alexander Reisenbichler and Kimberly J. Morgan

Although the common wisdom is that Germany's success is the hard-won reward for strict economic management, the country owes much of its good fortune to the eurozone crisis. Immigrants and investors’ cash are flowing into the country from the rest of Europe, in order to escape the dire conditions that Merkel and EU technocrats helped create through their hard-line focus on austerity, structural reforms, and price stability.

Snapshot,
Marci Shore

With a general election approaching in Germany this fall, Angela Merkel finds herself mired in a scandal about her communist upbringing. The belated reckoning with Merkel's past reveals little about the chancellor's political sympathies -- and plenty about the German public's historical ignorance.

Snapshot,
Brendan Simms

Margaret Thatcher re-established the United Kingdom as a major force on the international scene. But she failed to see that the best hope for Europe's future was integration.

Review Essay, Mar/Apr 2013
Brendan Simms

Foreign policy realists have long found inspiration in the ideas of Lord Castlereagh, who served as British foreign secretary during and after the Napoleonic Wars. A new biography of the statesman presents him as more ideological than is traditionally assumed, and suggests that his example is more relevant than ever -- and might even hold the key to solving Europe's ongoing crisis.

Snapshot,
Daniela Schwarzer and Kai-Olaf Lang

Germany has the strongest economy in Europe, but its financial strength does not translate into political supremacy. In recent months, Berlin has lost both allies and influence, and it will need to compromise in order to stabilize the eurozone.

Comment, Sept/Oct 2012
Adam Tooze

Germany seems like Europe’s lone island of fiscal stability, but trouble lurks under its impressive export-fueled growth. An obsession with debt and austerity has blocked domestic investment as the country has ignored problems such as a shrinking work force and outdated infrastructure. Germany needs to borrow and spend more or face the end of its economic miracle.

Comment, Jul/Aug 2012
Sebastian Mallaby

If the eurozone splinters, it will have been an avoidable disaster. After all, the European Central Bank has already gone to great lengths to shore up the continent’s financial system. Now, the choice lies with Germany, which can save the monetary union if it allows for policies aimed at debt relief and growth, not just slashing deficits.

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