Europe

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Snapshot,
David Gordon and Thomas Wright

Greece's new leaders have effectively united Europe against them. To repair the damage and keep the country's economy afloat, they need to rethink their message and adjust their demands.

Snapshot,
Paolo Spada and Hollie Russon Gilman

At a time of record low trust in public institutions, thousands of new channels for citizen involvement in government are opening across the world. They go further than electoral participation; they increase citizens’ ability to monitor, regulate, and, in some cases, directly affect political decision-making.

Video,
Gideon Rose and R. Daniel Kelemen

Despite all the grim predictions, the European Union is not on the verge of collapse. Quite the contrary: if European leaders act with resolve and persistence, the union could experience a rebirth.

Snapshot,
Soner Cagaptay and Marc Sievers

The chaos in the Middle East has tested many relationships, not least the one between Egypt and Turkey. In the immediate term, it seems likely that the two countries' rivalry will exacerbate the Libyan civil war. Further out, even worse could be in store.

Postscript,
Stathis N. Kalyvas

Greece and its European partners are now expected to reach a new, long-term deal for the country’s financing by June. Given the dire state of the Greek finances and its continuing exclusion from bond markets, this agreement could take the form of a third bailout reaching 30 billion euros.

Snapshot,
Aaron Stein

Turkey has long supported the terrorist group al-Nusra as a way to pressure the Assad regime. But there is no evidence to suggest that Turkey ever gave support to ISIS, once its leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, split from al-Nusra in 2013.

Snapshot,
Mitchell A. Orenstein, Péter Krekó, and Attila Juhász

When Hungary passed laws entitling Hungarians living abroad to Hungarian passports and then the right to vote in Hungarian elections, it fanned dangerous nationalistic flames and fueled fears of secessionist movements in Hungarian communities beyond the country’s border.

Snapshot,
Omar G. Encarnación

After the radical-left Syriza party came to power in Greece, attention has turned to Spain's Podemos—a leftist party gaining traction in the polls—that could matter even more for European austerity policies.

Snapshot,
Mark Blyth and Cornel Ban

Just as Julius Caesar crossed the Rubicon river, in spite of the warnings of the Roman Senate not to, so has Alex Tsipras, leader of the anti-austerity party, Syriza, decided to try to end austerity in Greece, in spite of Europe’s leaders saying he shouldn’t. Whether Tsipras will succeed is still unclear, but whatever happens, his victory represents a crucial turning point for Europe—a signal that time has run out on austerity policies.

Postscript,
Stathis N. Kalyvas

Talk of overturning austerity aside, Greece still needs the last 7.2 billion euro installment of the bailout to cover its financing gap. For the time being, then, the new government will need to abide by the program’s requirements—that is, the very combination of austerity and reform that Syriza has pledged to overturn. This may be enough to break the party.

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