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Snapshot,
Tom Keatinge

Since 2011, FATF, the international body charged with developing policies to combat money laundering and terrorism financing, has had Turkey on its gray list of high-risk and non-cooperative jurisdictions. Here's why.

Snapshot,
Milada Vachudova

The defenders of the Dayton Accords are well intentioned, but they have also enabled Bosnia’s unraveling.

Snapshot,
Victor Gaetan

Gulen has tried to develop a genuinely modern school of Islam that reconciles the religion with liberal democracy, scientific rationalism, ecumenism, and free enterprise.

Snapshot,
Michael J. Koplow

As a U.S. ally, Turkey has been lacking for some time. But it is only recently that the United States has started to voice its displeasure. If Turkey’s sudden about-face on a number of issues is any indication, the Obama administration should have made getting tougher with Turkey a priority long ago.

Comment, 2014
Jan-Werner Müller

Ten years ago, eight eastern European states joined the European Union, seemingly locking them onto an upward developmental trajectory. But now this supposed triumph is in serious doubt, as most those countries are experiencing profound political crises.

Snapshot,
Halil Karaveli

In power for over a decade, Turkey's Islamists are proving to be their own worst enemy. The alliance of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s AKP and the movement of Fethullah Gülen, a Muslim cleric who leads his congregation from self-imposed exile in the United States, is imploding. As it does, the public is losing faith in both and the military is gearing up to insert itself into politics once more.

Snapshot,
Piotr Zalewski

Many market watchers were relieved when Turkey's central bank recently raised its lending rate. Turkey's prime minister was not one of them.

Video,

Foreign Affairs Editor Gideon Rose moderates a discussion on the new emerging markets of Poland, South Korea, and Turkey.

Video,

Gideon Rose, editor of Foreign Affairs, sits down with Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Snapshot,
David A. Bell

France’s stated reasons for intervention have changed over the years. But if France wants genuinely to establish itself as a leader in purely humanitarian interventions, it should do so anywhere but Africa.

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