Europe

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Snapshot,
Tom Keatinge

One form of terrorist financing, arguably the most profitable, has evaded the global counterterrorism effort: kidnapping for ransom. Most of the ransom payments appear to be funded by European governments, but all of them have evaded sanctions and international censure.

Snapshot,
Elmira Bayrasli

In an election, coming in third place is rarely cause for celebration. But for Selahattin Demirtas, the charismatic and telegenic 41-year-old politician who ran in Turkey’s August 10 presidential election, it was. Nearly ten percent of Turkish voters cast their ballots for Demirtas, a Kurd.

Snapshot,
Claire Sadar and Brent E. Sasley

Given his imperious attitude, Erdogan is often compared to Ataturk. But Erdogan has something Ataturk did not, namely the near-complete loyalty of his party, which provides a ready mechanism for setting policy. In that, another Turkish political figure offers an even better point of comparison: Turgut Ozal.

Essay, SEPT/OCT 2014
Mark Blyth and Eric Lonergan

Most economists agree that the global economy is stagnating and that governments need to stimulate growth, but lowering interest rates still further could spur a damaging cycle of booms and busts. Instead, central banks should hand consumers cash directly.

Snapshot,
Halil Karaveli

Erdogan will likely win this weekend's presidential election. But the foundations of his power are unstable. His policies will eventually put him at odds with some of his most important backers: Istanbul-based big business and the religiously conservative business community in Turkey’s heartland, Anatolia. Indeed, they already have.

Postscript,
Jan-Werner Müller

Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban recently announced his government’s decisive break with liberal democracy. If EU leaders do not address this problem, they could soon lose Hungary for good.

Snapshot,
Ivan Perkins

Political scientists have long argued that professional militaries provide the strongest bulwark against political upheavals and violent power struggles. But a closer look at the historical record leads to a different conclusion: stability is a product not of military virtues but the rule of law.

Letter From,
Hooman Majd

Vienna's opulent Palais Coburg was originally designed as a palace for Austria’s former Habsburg dynasty. But amid the tense negotiating sessions over the future of Iran's nuclear program, it could sometimes feel more like a prison -- for diplomats and journalists alike.

Snapshot,
Mitchell A. Orenstein

Out to earn a dollar on the Russian natural resource trade, European nations such as the Netherlands have long kept smiling as the Kremlin has continued to humiliate them. But now the airline disaster, combined with Moscow’s attempts to cover up its role in the tragedy, will likely force Europe to get real about its eastern neighbor.

Snapshot,
Jan-Werner Müller

The Europe of today is a creation of Christian Democrats. Yet both as a set of ideas and as a political movement, Christian democracy is growing less influential and less coherent. As the larger project of European integration faces new risks, then, its most important backer may soon prove incapable of defending it. 

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