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Snapshot,
Timothy H. Edgar

Since 2013, when Edward Snowden revealed that the NSA had been spying on private communications on a mass scale, U.S. President Barack Obama has faced pressure to tighten privacy laws. The administration has made more progress than many think.

Snapshot,
Bhaskar Chakravorti, Christopher Tunnard, and Ravi Shankar Chaturvedi

Estonia is the gold standard when it comes to digital innovation. The question is: How does the rest of the world catch up?

Snapshot,
Amrita Narlikar

Developed and developing countries use poverty as a bargaining tool. Here's how.

Snapshot,
Milosz Reterski

In defending its vital interests in the Arctic, the United States lacks a critical tool: mighty nuclear-powered icebreakers that would solidify its economic and strategic role in the region. Russia is surging ahead in this area, and the United States must catch up.   

Essay, Nov/Dec 2014
Richard N. Haass

With U.S. hegemony waning and no successor waiting to pick up the baton, the current international system will likely give way to a larger number of power centers acting with increasing autonomy. The post–Cold War order is unraveling, and it will be missed.

Snapshot,
Joseph Chinyong Liow

The economic potential of the Arctic is undoubtedly considerable, and that has heightened Asian interest in the region. Because these are perilous times for the Arctic environment, though, the exploration (and exploitation) of the area needs to be done sustainably.

Essay, JUL/AUG 2014
Erik Brynjolfsson, Andrew McAfee, and Michael Spence

Machines are substituting for more types of human labor than ever before. This means that the real winners of the future will be neither the providers of cheap labor nor the owners of ordinary capital, but rather those who can innovate and create new products, services, and business models.

Essay, JUL/AUG 2014
Benn Steil

In today’s dollar-dominated financial system, changes in U.S. monetary policy can have immediate and significant global effects, wrecking economies and toppling regimes. As a result, for many countries monetary sovereignty is nothing but a dream.

Video,
Stuart Reid and Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson

Stuart Reid, senior editor at Foreign Affairs, sits down with Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson, president of Iceland.

Snapshot,
Alan B. Sielen

There is no shortage of international recommendations, action plans, and other prescriptions for restoring the oceans’ health. The problem is not ignorance but political will. Yet the longer governments and societies delay action, the worse things will get. Here are some things they can start doing now.

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