Levant

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Snapshot,

We poll experts on whether they think the United States should significantly step up its military campaign against ISIS in Iraq and Syria.

Snapshot,
Khalil al-Anani

On November 10, Ansar Beit al-Maqdis, a militant movement that operates out of the northern Sinai Peninsula, pledged allegiance to ISIS. The new merger underscores just how unstable Egypt remains—and how the military government may be losing its grip.

Snapshot,
Oula Abdulhamid Alrifai

Since the start of the Syrian conflict, the country’s Alawites have kept President Bashar al-Assad in power. But there are signs that he is now losing their support.

Snapshot,
Brent E. Sasley

The Israeli election process is complicated and volatile. This makes it interesting to watch, but difficult—if not impossible—to predict. No matter who wins in March, the government would have to be an exception to the rule to last out its full term.

Snapshot,
Nicholas Sambanis and Jonah Schulhofer-Wohl

The usual argument for partition is that, once ethnic or sectarian fighting gets too bloody, nobody can put Humpty Dumpty back together again. The argument seems intuitive, but it rests on a flawed premise.

Snapshot,
Louise Shelley

A key element of U.S. President Barack Obama’s strategy against ISIS has been striking at the oil fields seized by the group to undermine its finances. But ISIS is a diversified criminal business, and oil is only one of its several revenue streams. U.S. officials ignore that fact at their own peril.

Snapshot,
Rory Miller

Tomorrow, the French National Assembly is set to vote on a resolution recognizing a Palestinian state. Although the act would be nonbinding, the vote is a referendum on whether France can follow through on its claim as the West's truest champion of the Palestinian cause.

Snapshot,
J. Trevor Ulbrick

To date, three million Syrians have fled the war in their country. The exodus has now surpassed the Rwandan genocide as the largest refugee crisis since World War II.

Snapshot,
Gunes Murat Tezcur and Sabri Ciftci

The past few weeks have seen a wave of Muslims from all around the world joining the ranks of ISIS. Although most of the attention has been on those coming from the United States and Europe, the bulk of foreign fighters has actually come from places like Turkey, from which the flow of jihadists is particularly puzzling.

Snapshot,
Lauren Harrison

Discussions of the Holocaust aside, Germany and Israel are still rarely mentioned in the same breath. Yet Berlin has long been one of the most successfuland secretiveintermediaries between Jerusalem and its enemies.

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