Israel

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Snapshot,
Daniel Kurtzer

The ultimate victory in Israeli elections belongs not to Netanyahu but to the country's right wing. The results showed that this force has become a permanent majority—a strength that comes regardless of who leads it.

Snapshot,
Brent E. Sasley

As the post-election dust settles in Israel, it has grown clear how long-standing cultural and political shifts shaped this year’s vote. 

Snapshot,
Michael J. Koplow

Those hoping that a Prime Minister Herzog would bring about a momentous shift in Israeli foreign policy will be disappointed. No matter who emerges as victor following the election and the inevitable weeks of haggling and horse-trading that go into forming a coalition, Israel’s foreign policy on the big issues will be marked by consistency rather than transformation.

Snapshot,
Asher Orkaby

Observers might be surprised to hear of increasingly friendly relations between Israel and Saudi Arabia. But a warming of relations—and even coordinated military operationswould hardly be unprecedented, as the historical record makes clear.

Snapshot,
Zachary J. Foster

It is not often that politicians make public pronouncements about the historical origins of national identities, but the Palestinian identity is a unique case. It has long been the source of controversy and mystery.

Snapshot,
Brent E. Sasley

Observers accuse Netanyahu of using his recent speech to the U.S. Congress to drum up support in the upcoming Israeli election. But even there, his talk will probably matter very little.

Snapshot,
John B. Judis

The Democratic and Republican divide over Israel may be at its worst, but bipartisan support for Israel began to erode decades ago.

Snapshot,
Lisa Goldman

Commentators are arguing about whether Netanyahu is damaging Israel’s security by alienating Obama. It seems unlikely that the White House will cut back on military aid or stop vetoing anti-Israel legislation at the UN.

Snapshot,
Benedetta Berti and Zack Gold

At a rally for Hamas in Gaza, a spokesman for the group warned that the continued blockade on the area “will push Hamas to carry out actions which could be described as crazy.” When it comes to Hamas, such rhetoric is par for the course—except for one thing: the target of the group's threat was not Israel. Demonstrators were there to protest Egyptian policies.

Snapshot,
Benedetta Berti

The reported January 18 Israeli airstrike against a Hezbollah–Iranian car convoy in southern Syria is the latest and boldest in a series of tit-for-tat operations that, since last February, have gradually eroded the old order and inched Israel and Hezbollah ever closer to a war that neither wants.

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