Lebanon

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Snapshot,
Bilal Y. Saab

Last week, Lebanon's prime minister resigned under intimidation from Hezbollah. The party is trying to fortify its position in Lebanon, since it can no longer count on its Syrian ally, Bashar al-Assad. But Hezbollah ought to know by now that it will not be able to rule Lebanon alone or with an iron fist.

Snapshot,
Mona Yacoubian

With Bashar al-Assad's regime on the brink of collapse, Hezbollah stands to lose a close ally. And by supporting Damascus' repression, the organization has compromised its reputation in a region gripped by anti-autocratic fervor. Given that, an off-balance Hezbollah may well shift gears, focusing less on its regional ambitions and more on domestic Lebanese politics.

Snapshot,
William Harris

More than six years after former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri was murdered, the UN-backed court charged with investigating his assassination and associated attacks has released its indictments. Now, if the tribunal fails to punish the masterminds of the conspiracy, it will end up setting back Lebanese politics and the cause of international justice around the world.

Snapshot,
Mara E. Karlin

Although the Druze tend to be overlooked, the community is likely to play a vital role in determining the outcome of Lebanon's tribunal process.

Snapshot,
Yossi Klein Halevi

With the Muslim Brotherhood poised to gain influence in Egypt, Israel sees itself as almost completely encircled by hostile forces. Is an Egyptian-Iranian alliance a possibility -- and where would this leave the future of a sovereign Palestinian state?

Letter From,
Michael Young

In bringing down its government last week, did Lebanon just witness a coup d’etat or did it narrowly dodge civil war? Either way, Damascus, Tehran, and Washington are all watching.

Snapshot,
Omar M. Dajani and Ezzedine C. Fishere

A standing army in the West Bank will not keep Israelis safe. But a multilateral security agreement could.

Snapshot,
Bilal Y. Saab

The investigation into former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri's assassination has highlighted the detrimental role that Hezbollah plays in Lebanese politics, and placed Lebanon at the center of a regional power struggle that the United States cannot afford to ignore.

Essay, Sep/Oct 2010
Robert Malley and Peter Harling

With protests raging across the Middle East, how should Washington respond? In an essay from the September/October issue, Robert Malley and Peter Harling argue that the Obama administration must recognize that there is not a clean divide between a moderate pro-American camp and an extremist militant axis.

Snapshot,
Mara E. Karlin

Hezbollah will not peacefully disarm soon, and to assert that it may betrays a fundamental misunderstanding of Hezbollah’s nature, Lebanese politics, and regional dynamics.

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