Syria

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Snapshot,
J. Trevor Ulbrick

To date, three million Syrians have fled the war in their country. The exodus has now surpassed the Rwandan genocide as the largest refugee crisis since World War II.

Snapshot,
Gunes Murat Tezcur and Sabri Ciftci

The past few weeks have seen a wave of Muslims from all around the world joining the ranks of ISIS. Although most of the attention has been on those coming from the United States and Europe, the bulk of foreign fighters has actually come from places like Turkey, from which the flow of jihadists is particularly puzzling.

Snapshot,
Piotr Zalewski

Kurds have a right to take Turkey to task for its inaction in Kobani, just as Turks have a right to insist that Kurdish suffering in Syria does not give the PKK license to kill civilians or off-duty soldiers in Turkey.

Snapshot,
Steven Simon

Obama faces a tragic choice between restraint against ISIS to avoid entanglement in Syria’s civil war or full engagement against ISIS with an eye to regime change and the reconstruction and stabilization of a devastated country. After Afghanistan, Iraq, and Libya, we have a rough idea of what such an effort would entail and of the elusiveness of lasting gains.

Snapshot,
Lionel Beehner

To justify possible attacks on ISIS in Syria, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry invoked the right to hot pursuit -- an old maritime precept. But using this rationale would put Washington on a slippery legal slope. 

Snapshot,
Halil Karaveli

Turkey has anticipated Assad’s downfall ever since protests first broke out in Syria in 2011. It has been disappointed at every turn, though, and now it is not only Assad who is in trouble but Turkey as well.

Snapshot,
Firas Maksad

The growing opposition among Druze to the Assad regime, alongside their deep hostility toward Islamic radicals, puts this small but influential group in a unique position.

Comment, Nov/Dec 2014
Daniel Byman and Jeremy Shapiro

ISIS' army has attracted a stream of Western volunteers, but there is no reason to panic about their return home. Some may come back as terrorists, but the danger has been exaggerated, and the United States and the EU know how to handle such problems.

Snapshot,
Jytte Klausen

Not all Westerners return home from jihad abroad to take part in a violent attack. But many do, and they tend to become involved with extremely dangerous plans.

Snapshot,
Michael J. Koplow

The official view from Ankara might be sunny -- yet the clouds massing on the country’s border presage a domestic hurricane.

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