North Africa

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Snapshot,
Soner Cagaptay and Marc Sievers

The chaos in the Middle East has tested many relationships, not least the one between Egypt and Turkey. In the immediate term, it seems likely that the two countries' rivalry will exacerbate the Libyan civil war. Further out, even worse could be in store.

Snapshot,
Geoffrey Howard

ISIS is no longer just an Iraq and Syria problem. For months now, the terrorist group has been pushing into Libya as well.

Snapshot,
Benedetta Berti and Zack Gold

At a rally for Hamas in Gaza, a spokesman for the group warned that the continued blockade on the area “will push Hamas to carry out actions which could be described as crazy.” When it comes to Hamas, such rhetoric is par for the course—except for one thing: the target of the group's threat was not Israel. Demonstrators were there to protest Egyptian policies.

Snapshot,
Conor Seyle

Governments have traditionally combatted piracy with brute military force. More recently, however, states have opted for a different approach and seen surprising success.

Snapshot,
Clint Watts

If al Qaeda were a corporation today, it would be a big name but an aging brand, one now strikingly out of touch with 18–35-year-olds.

Letter From,
Frederic Wehrey

Amid the political and communal divisions tearing apart Libya, the commercial hub of Misrata—and its pragmatic business community—offer modest hope for a political solution.

Snapshot,
Jonathan Laurence

Although the absolutism of French republican ideals has inspired democracies worldwide for centuries, it has only been France's gradual adjustment of those ideals to social and demographic realities—first to its Jewish population and in the future, perhaps, to the Muslim community or to the right—that afforded the country lasting political stability.

Snapshot,
Marina Ottaway

After three years of battles in the streets, in the National Constituent Assembly, and at the ballot box, Tunisia has officially completed its formal transition to democracy.

Snapshot,
Sushrut Jangi

Not far from Tahrir Square sprawls Sayyida Zeinab, an impoverished district named after the patron saint of Cairo. But behind the ancient mosques, apartments, and historic coffee shops is something new and unexpected: a children’s cancer hospital built on the old bones of a defunct slaughterhouse.

Snapshot,
Khalil al-Anani

On November 10, Ansar Beit al-Maqdis, a militant movement that operates out of the northern Sinai Peninsula, pledged allegiance to ISIS. The new merger underscores just how unstable Egypt remains—and how the military government may be losing its grip.

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