Egypt

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Snapshot,
Nathan J. Brown and Michele Dunne

Egypt's judiciary once acted as a brake on the most authoritarian impulses of successive regimes. But now it is leading the crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood.

Snapshot,
Jeff Martini

A return to military dictatorship in Egypt seems all but certain. But two things could undermine the generals. First, as the threat of the Muslim Brotherhood recedes, it will become difficult for them to hold together a governing coalition of leftists, liberals, and Salafists that is built solely on its members’ shared antipathy for the Islamist group. Second, the new regime might overreach in its suppression of the opposition, inviting a backlash.

Snapshot,
Mara Revkin

When Egypt’s 31-year-old emergency law finally expired in May 2012, Egyptians hoped that the days of arbitrary arrests and crackdowns on dissent in the name of national security were over. But thanks to an unprecedented counterterrorism clause in Egypt's new constitution, those days are here to stay.

Snapshot,
Joshua Stacher

Anyone who claims to possess full political power in post-Mubarak Egypt is lying. That even goes for Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, the military’s commander in chief and Egypt’s current defense minister, whose impending presidential candidacy reveals the military's weakness more than strength.

Snapshot,
Emily Dyer

The 2011 revolution may have toppled President Hosni Mubarak, but it did not liberate Egyptian women. Sexual harassment and assault have worsened since his departure, reflecting both long-term trends in government policy and more recent shifts during Egypt’s seesawing transition.

Snapshot,
Steven A. Cook

Nearly 150 years after its completion, the Suez Canal continues to inspire awe. But given recent developments in politics, economics, and security, some see it as a mere relic. In fact, the waterway ensures Cairo's continued relevance to the United States and the region.

Snapshot,
Michael J. Koplow

Egypt's generals promise democracy once they deal with the Islamist threat -- and the secular camp has cheered them on. But as Tunisia's experience 25 years ago shows, it's hard to put the authoritarian genie back in the bottle once it has been let out. In other words, the liberals are next.

Snapshot,
Zack Gold

Even as Egypt’s generals continue their violent crackdown on supporters of deposed President Mohamed Morsi, Israel has been lobbying the international community to give the military its full backing. But as Sinai descends into chaos, Israel might find that it was better off with Morsi in power.

Snapshot,
Tarek Osman

In the coming weeks and years, the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood will likely undergo a painful internal struggle between those who want to give in to victimhood and respond with violence and those who realize that it is time to move on. The result will almost certainly be the group's fragmentation.

Snapshot,
Erica Chenoweth

By deciding to hold mass sit-ins across Egypt, the pro-Morsi protesters were making use of a time-honored tactic of civil resistance. But tactics are the not the same as a strategy and, in this case, would not likely promote the very things that allow protests movements to succeed: diverse participation, the avoidance of repression, and the defection of regime loyalists.

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