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Snapshot,
Dalia Dassa Kaye

The longer the conflict in Gaza continues, the harder it will be to insulate the negotiations from other events in the region -- and that does not bode well for a successful outcome.

Snapshot,
Emily Dyer and Louise Millet

Some supporters of Iranian President Hassan Rouhani had hoped that he would dial back attacks on women's rights. Just a year into his time in office, though, he has left those backers disappointed. In some cases, his government is just as bad as his predecessor’s.

Snapshot,
Dalia Dassa Kaye

There is a tendency in the United States to believe that a loss for the West must be a gain for Iran. But, in Iraq, both sides are losing in the face of a common foe.

Snapshot,
Mohsen Milani

Tehran is organizing Shia-dominated militias to combat Sunni insurgents in Iran. At the same time, though, it is trying to frame the conflict in non-sectarian terms. Iranian policymakers may be less capable of finessing the rhetorical and operational tensions than they would like to think.

Comment, 2014
Ray Takeyh

Conventional wisdom about the 1953 coup in Iran rests on the myth that the CIA toppled the country's democratically elected prime minister. In reality, the coup was primarily a domestic Iranian affair, and the CIA's impact was ultimately insignificant.

Snapshot,
Colin H. Kahl

This week, Iranian and U.S. diplomats raced to Geneva for unscheduled, high-level bilateral talks. The news might have come as a surprise, but it shouldn’t have. The deadline to reach a comprehensive nuclear deal with Iran -- July 20 -- is fast approaching, and the parties still have significant differences to overcome.

Snapshot,
Peter D. Feaver and Eric Lorber

The same attributes that make sanctions effective can also make them difficult to unwind. That poses a big problem: If Washington can't ease the pressure when states comply with its demands, it can't expect to achieve its most important goals.

Essay, May/June 2014
Kurt M. Campbell and Ely Ratner

Asia is going to command ever more attention and resources from the United States, thanks to the region’s growing prosperity and influence and the enormous challenges the region poses. The Obama administration’s pivot or rebalancing makes sense; the challenge now is giving it proper form, substance, and resources.

Essay, May/June 2014
Walter Russell Mead

Whether it is Russian forces seizing Crimea, China making aggressive claims in its coastal waters, or Iran trying to dominate the Middle East, old-fashioned power plays are back. These revisionist powers never bought into the geopolitical settlement that followed the Cold War, and their ongoing attempts to overturn it will not be peaceful.

Essay, May/June 2014
G. John Ikenberry

China, Iran, and Russia are not determined to undo the post–Cold War settlement. They are not full-scale revisionist powers but, at most, part-time spoilers. The United States is far more powerful and has built a robust liberal world order countries need to integrate with in order to succeed.

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