Yemen

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Snapshot,
Mohsen Milani

Saudi Arabia is grossly exaggerating Iran’s power in Yemen to justify its own expansionist ambitions. Iran is not the cause of the civil war, nor are the Houthis its proxy. Chaos, not Iran, controls the Arab world's poorest nation.

Snapshot,
Charles Schmitz

Many suspect former Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh of using the Houthis, his old enemies, to try to regain power. But in the end, he may end up as the conflict's biggest loser.

Snapshot,
Philippe Bolopion and Belkis Wille

The Saudi Arabia-led bombing campaign in Yemen is off to a dreadful start, at least when it comes to the civilian toll. And now that the United States has offered its support, it will be associated with the bloodshed.

Postscript,
Michael Bröning

The establishment of a truly representative Arab army operating under the auspices of a reformed Arab League would be a welcome addition to the region, but the proposed “unified Arab force”—helpful in glossing over tensions among Sunni states but detrimental to relations between the Arab League and Iran—is not.

Snapshot,
Aaron Stein

Although Turkey has sided with Saudi Arabia in Yemen, it won't be backing Riyadh in opposing the region's Shiite powers anytime soon. Rather, Ankara's strategy relies on carefully balancing Saudi Arabia and Iran.

Snapshot,
Bilal Y. Saab

With the intervention in Yemen, Saudi Arabia’s military is trying to kill several birds with one stone: safeguard the country from an immediate military threat, assert its leadership of the Arab world, and redress what it sees as a geopolitical imbalance in the Middle East between itself and Iran.

Snapshot,
Alex Vatanka

Iran may have been happy to see Yemen's pro-Western government ousted last January, but Tehran's influence there is far more limited than many assume.

Snapshot,
Farea Al-muslimi

Last month, U.S. President Barack Obama suggested that Yemen could be an example for how to bring stability to Iraq. His comments came as a shock to most Yemenis. The contradiction between their country’s political reality and its reputation as an Arab Spring success story has always been glaring, but now it had become absurd.

Snapshot,
Adam Heffez

In a little over a decade, Sana’a, Yemen, might become the world’s first capital to run out of water, turning its millions of citizens into water refugees. A major cause: the cultivation of qat, a mild narcotic plant that takes unusually large amounts of water to farm and to which much of Yemen's population is addicted.

Essay, Jul/Aug 2013
Daniel Byman

The Obama administration relies on drones for one simple reason: they work. Drone strikes have devastated al Qaeda at little financial cost, at no risk to U.S. forces, and with fewer civilian casualties than many alternative methods would have caused.

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