Middle East

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Snapshot,
Reza Marashi

To avoid another failed round of nuclear negotiations with Tehran, Washington must understand why Iran is at the negotiating table.

Snapshot,
Benedetta Berti and Zack Gold

At a rally for Hamas in Gaza, a spokesman for the group warned that the continued blockade on the area “will push Hamas to carry out actions which could be described as crazy.” When it comes to Hamas, such rhetoric is par for the course—except for one thing: the target of the group's threat was not Israel. Demonstrators were there to protest Egyptian policies.

Snapshot,
Piotr Zalewski

In Turkey, the government and judiciary are using blasphemy laws to justify censorship.

Snapshot,
@pedestrian

In Iran, mass urbanization, increasing access to social media, and a more secular public space (despite propaganda otherwise) have made finding potential mates leagues more complicated.

Snapshot,
Claire Sadar

Many suspect Erdogan of taking Turkey in an Islamist direction. But his real objective is a different kind of state: a secular autocracy more similar to Russia than Iran.

Snapshot,
Conor Seyle

Governments have traditionally combatted piracy with brute military force. More recently, however, states have opted for a different approach and seen surprising success.

Snapshot,
Mia Bloom and John Horgan

The exploitation of children by terrorist groups is not new, but groups such as ISIS, Boko Haram, and the Pakistani Taliban are increasingly using children to carry out their strategies.

Snapshot,
Michael Pregent and Robin Simcox

The Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) is starting to show some wear and tear. True, it has pulled off some gruesome executions, attracted jihadists from across the world, and still holds swaths of Iraq and Syria. But cracks are appearing in the self-styled Caliphate.

Letter From,
Kayhan Barzegar

U.S. President Barak Obama has set a difficult goal in the war against the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS). To achieve it, he will need to bring Iran on board, especially in the Syrian peace talks.

Snapshot,
David Schenker

If the past is precedent, Kasasbeh’s death at the hands of ISIS could signal a change—at least temporarily—in Jordanian popular attitudes toward the war and presage a more robust role for the kingdom in military operations.

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