Middle East

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Snapshot,
Halil Karaveli

Turkey has anticipated Assad’s downfall ever since protests first broke out in Syria in 2011. It has been disappointed at every turn, though, and now it is not only Assad who is in trouble but Turkey as well.

Snapshot,
Firas Maksad

The growing opposition among Druze to the Assad regime, alongside their deep hostility toward Islamic radicals, puts this small but influential group in a unique position.

Snapshot,
Daphna Canetti, Sivan Hirsch-Hoefler, and Ehud Eiran

Being exposed to violence makes one more likely to reject of peace and back extremists. Any effort to settle the conflict between the Israelis and Palestinians must, therefore, include greater efforts to deal with the personal traumas on both sides that now drive this 100-year war.

Snapshot,
Frederic Wehrey and Wolfram Lacher

There are now two parallel governments in Libya, which has resulted in a society torn asunder by chaos. But it would be a mistake to recognize either side as the country's legitimate authority.

Snapshot,
Salam Fayyad

Pressing the reset button on the stalled Israeli-Palestinian peace process won't work. In the absence of fundamental changes to the existing framework, the process will be doomed to failure.

Comment, Nov/Dec 2014
Daniel Byman and Jeremy Shapiro

ISIS' army has attracted a stream of Western volunteers, but there is no reason to panic about their return home. Some may come back as terrorists, but the danger has been exaggerated, and the United States and the EU know how to handle such problems.

Snapshot,
Jytte Klausen

Not all Westerners return home from jihad abroad to take part in a violent attack. But many do, and they tend to become involved with extremely dangerous plans.

Snapshot,
Michael J. Koplow

The official view from Ankara might be sunny -- yet the clouds massing on the country’s border presage a domestic hurricane.

Review Essay,
Jordan Chandler Hirsch

The Egyptian-Israeli peace deal is the one aspect of the Middle Eastern order that has not fallen apart in recent years. But a new book misinterprets Washington's contribution to the agreement. Far from breaking the shackles of religion, history, and geopolitics that had previously ensnared the parties and prevented them from making concessions, the United States played a much more modest role.

Snapshot,
Rory Miller

Thanks to its booming technology sector, Israel has struck many new trade partnerships, including with China and India. So far, however, its thriving trade ties have done little to win support for its often contentious foreign policy. 

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