Central Asia

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Snapshot,
Jacob Stokes

While the world focuses on China’s aggression in the seas to its east, China’s leaders are looking west with their "One Belt, One Road" strategy. If successful, the ambitious program would make China a principal economic and diplomatic force in Eurasian integration.

Snapshot,
Alisher Ilkhamov and Jeff Goldstein

Uzbekistani President Islam Karimov may have won yet another fraudulent election, but challenges to his rule abound.

Snapshot,
Nate Schenkkan

What started off as a relatively simple customs union in early 2014 has been transformed by treaty into a single economic space. But expansion has come at the cost of the union’s coherence, and as Russia’s economy spirals into crisis, the prognosis for 2015 is dire.

Snapshot,
Nate Schenkkan

Sanctions might not stop Russia's destabilization of Ukraine, but Western policymakers should embrace them for another reason: because they can put a nail in the coffin of the project that started the Ukraine crisis to begin with -- Eurasian integration.

Snapshot,
Lawrence P. Markowitz

Why do some weak states survive while others collapse? For Tajikistan and Uzbekistan, at least, the secret lies in the state's ability to manage corruption.

Snapshot,
Philip Shishkin

In just a few short years, Eugene Gourevitch has gone from Kyrgyzstan's premier financier and confidant of the ruling family, to wanted man, to FBI informant. His story shows just how business gets done in many corners of the post-Soviet world.

Video,
Jonathan Tepperman and Alexander Cooley

Managing Editor Jonathan Tepperman interviews author Alexander Cooley on the geopolitical role of Central Asia, and how outside powers--Russia, China, and the United States--are competing for influence in the region, as the British and Russian empires did a century ago.

Snapshot,
Samuel Charap and Alexandros Petersen

The United States may have reset its Russia policy, but the U.S. approach to the other states in the region is in dire need of a conceptual revolution.

Letter From,
David Trilling

Over the years, both Russia and the United States have tried to court Kyrgyzstan. Did their strategic competition help push President Kurmanbek Bakiyev from office?

Snapshot,
George Gavrilis

By lowering its sights and concentrating on order, the international community has helped to stabilize Tajikistan. The same cheap, simple approach could work in Afghanistan, too.

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