Eastern Europe & Caucasus

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Snapshot,
Paul Stronski

Criminal and militant groups in eastern Ukraine, although formally united against the Ukrainian state, are mostly just interested in the spoils of war. The commanders of these groups have little incentive to build a peace that weakens their own power.

Snapshot,
Olena Lennon

The nationalistic ideology among some in the Ukrainian diaspora is fueling extreme sentiments both abroad and in their homeland.

Essay,
Rolf Mützenich

Despite being misdefined by proponents and detractors alike, a new détente with Russia offers a way out of a political and military stalemate in the Ukraine crisis.

Snapshot,

We poll experts on whether they think the United States should arm Ukraine.

Snapshot,
Michael Kofman

The second Minsk ceasefire agreement had an inauspicious beginning. But hope remains. Much of frontline has calmed down, and the sides have started to exchanges prisoners. Although the recent agreement may not provide a final solution to the conflict, it has good prospects of freezing it.

Snapshot,
Van Jackson

Russia tends to make diplomatic overtures to North Korea whenever relations between Moscow and Washington sour. With U.S. strategy in Asia hanging in the balance, though, the repercussions of a stronger Russian-North Korean partnership could be different than ever before.

Snapshot,
Alexander J. Motyl

If and when Russia becomes friendly toward the West, Ukraine’s strategic importance will fade. Until then, defending Ukraine’s interests—security, stability, prosperity, and democracy—is the best way to defend the West’s own.

Snapshot,
Eric B. Schnurer

By launching an e-residency program, Estonia is leading the way to a new market—one in which states compete for customers just as businesses do.

Snapshot,
Taras Kuzio

Putin’s goal in Ukraine is simple. He wants to rebuild “New Russia,” the Tsarist empire's term for the eight Russian-speaking regions of eastern and southern Ukraine. After months of deadlock, pro-Russian groups are resorting to terrorism to get the job done.

Snapshot,
Nate Schenkkan

What started off as a relatively simple customs union in early 2014 has been transformed by treaty into a single economic space. But expansion has come at the cost of the union’s coherence, and as Russia’s economy spirals into crisis, the prognosis for 2015 is dire.

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