Eastern Europe & Caucasus

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Video,
Gideon Rose and Alexander J. Motyl

Gideon Rose, editor of Foreign Affairs, sits down with Alexander Motyl, professor of political science at Rutgers, to discuss the ongoing Ukraine crisis. 

Snapshot,
Alexander J. Motyl

This week saw a major escalation of Russian military involvement in Ukraine, which, until yesterday, had gone relatively unremarked in Western media. But now, no matter who fired the missile that brought down Malaysia Airlines flight 17, things are set to change. And that is bad news for Putin.

Snapshot,
Michael J. Mazarr

Recent events in Ukraine and Iraq portend a new era for international security. Today, the world’s major security risks stem from the wrath of societies or groups that feel alienated or left behind by the emerging liberal order.

Video,
Justin Vogt and Keith Gessen

Justin Vogt, deputy managing editor of Foreign Affairs, sits down with Keith Gessen, co-editor of n+1.

Essay, 2014
Erica Chenoweth and Maria J. Stephan

Revolts against authoritarian regimes don’t always succeed -- but they’re more likely to if they embrace civil resistance rather than violence. Over the last century, nonviolent campaigns have been twice as likely to succeed as violent ones and they increase the chances that toppling a dictatorship will lead to peace and democracy.

Snapshot,
Yuri M. Zhukov

The battle over eastern Ukraine is more economic than ethnic -- and Kiev's window to address its root causes is closing fast. 

Snapshot,
Alexei Arbatov and Vladimir Dvorkin

The upheaval in eastern and southern Ukraine comes with a hidden cost for one of the region’s little-known success stories: the close ties between the Russian and Ukrainian defense industrial bases. It is hard to overstate how damaging it could be to both countries if their military industries part ways.

Snapshot,
Nate Schenkkan

Sanctions might not stop Russia's destabilization of Ukraine, but Western policymakers should embrace them for another reason: because they can put a nail in the coffin of the project that started the Ukraine crisis to begin with -- Eurasian integration.

Snapshot,
Michael E. Brown

For 20 years, NATO security policy has been guided by flawed assumptions about Russia and the future of the West. Its leaders are now learning about those errors the hard way. As they scramble to respond to Russian aggression in Ukraine, they need to get back to NATO's core mission.

Snapshot,
Bruce Bueno de Mesquita and Alastair Smith

The turmoil unfolding in Ukraine provides the people of Ukraine with an opportunity to make their country a better place, but only if their leaders follow democratization's best practices. For the West, helping Ukraine become a functional democracy is also the best defense against Russian meddling.

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