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Snapshot,
Alex Vatanka

The standoff between Iran and the West has moved into the Caucasus, where both the Islamic Republic and Israel are trying to woo Azerbaijan -- a country with firm historical connections to Iran but whose interests have overlapped with those of Israel. The dynamic is upsetting the regional balance of power and threatening to overturn nearly two decades of uneasy peace.

Snapshot,
Thomas de Waal

Nine years after Georgia's Rose Revolution, its leader, Mikheil Saakashvili, was soundly defeated in parliamentary elections by the country's richest man. As the hope of the Rose Revolution fades, so, too, should the myth that Georgia is or ever will be a fully Westernized country.

Letter From,
Oliver Bullough

With a new visa-free travel regime and other overtures of "soft power," Georgia is attempting to win the favor of the citizens of the Russian North Caucasus. Is Moscow right to fear Tbilisi's new plan?

Snapshot,
Samuel Charap and Alexandros Petersen

The United States may have reset its Russia policy, but the U.S. approach to the other states in the region is in dire need of a conceptual revolution.

Letter From,
James Kirchick

Georgia's leaders are caught between a Kremlin bureaucracy that views their country as a lost province and a West that needs Russian cooperation on issues from energy to Iran.

Postscript,
Charles King

The recent EU report on the 2008 Russia-Georgia War confirms that both Georgia and Russia acted irresponsibly before and during the war. But it misses an opportunity to outline how the long-running territorial disputes of the Caucasus might be best resolved.

Letter From,
Lionel Beehner

One year after its war with Russia, Georgia is dispirited and unsure of its future. Has the United States staked too much on this small, fractured country in the Caucasus?

Comment, Mar/Apr 2004
Charles King

Georgia's recent, peaceful revolutions might allow the country to become a beacon of hope for a troubled region. For that to happen, however, its new leaders must find a way to deal with local secessionists, as well as with Moscow and Washington.

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