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Snapshot,
Alina Polyakova

By inking a deal with Russia last week, the West seemed to sign on to Russia’s strategy for the region -- “federalism” or, more likely, partition. The agreement itself quickly fell through, but Russia now has the West's acquiescence in writing.

Snapshot,
Michael O'Hanlon

Should Russia march into eastern Ukraine, the best way to respond would be to set up a permanent brigade of American light forces in the most vulnerable NATO members, namely, the Baltics -- Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania.

Snapshot,
Maria Popova

Given Ukraine's rule-of-law problems, it is not surprising that one of the Euromaidan protesters’ top demands was for legal reform. Nor is it surprising that the new government in Kiev has focused on clearing out the judiciary and emancipating it from its political subservience. But how it has gone about that will only make Ukraine's problems worse.

Postscript,
Keith Darden

For the first time since 1989, Europe is transforming. The primary protagonists, by most accounts, are Russia and the West. The bit of territory that they are clawing at -- Ukraine -- has largely been eclipsed. Yet inattention to Ukraine’s internal demons reflects a dangerous misreading of current events.

Snapshot,
Robert D. Crews

The Crimean crisis is not just about Russia’s relationship with the West. It is also very much about Islam’s role in Russia. Moscow's success in Crimea won't just depend upon economics or international politics, but on the delicate negotiations between Russian Muslim clerics and their fellow believers in Russia’s newest region.

Snapshot,
Anton Barbashin and Hannah Thoburn

Alexander Dugin’s Eurasianist ideology has influenced a whole generation of Russian conservatives and radicals and provided the intellectual basis for invading Ukraine. The philosophy has worked to Putin's advantage so far, but whether he can control it as he has so many others is a question that may determine his longevity in office.

Snapshot,
Mitchell A. Orenstein

The Putin regime is growing closer by the month to extreme right-wing parties across Europe -- somewhat surprising given that one of his stated reasons for invading Crimea was to prevent "Nazis" from coming to power. But, in both cases, Putin’s motives are not primarily ideological. In Western Europe, he hopes to destabilize his foes and install in Brussels politicians who will be focused on dismantling the EU rather than enlarging it.

Interview,
Anders Fogh Rasmussen

The secretary general of NATO speaks with Foreign Affairs about Russia and Ukraine, NATO enlargement, and the organization's responsibility to live up to its Article 5 commitments.

Snapshot,
Lee S. Wolosky

Economic sanctions and visa bans seem like an appealing way to punish Putin, both because there aren’t any realistic military options for countering him and comprehensive economic sanctions have had remarkable success in recent years, including in Iran. Unfortunately, Iran-like sanctions are not politically feasible in this case, and half measures won't get the United States what it seeks.

Postscript,
Alexander J. Motyl

To deal with Russian President Vladimir Putin, the West has to assume that he is rational and will respond to carrots and sticks. Accordingly, it should take him up on his proposal to form a working group on Ukraine, which would at least force everyone to take a deep breath and survey the situation with a measure of calm.

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