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Snapshot,
Alexander J. Motyl

This week saw a major escalation of Russian military involvement in Ukraine, which, until yesterday, had gone relatively unremarked in Western media. But now, no matter who fired the missile that brought down Malaysia Airlines flight 17, things are set to change. And that is bad news for Putin.

Snapshot,
Michael J. Mazarr

Recent events in Ukraine and Iraq portend a new era for international security. Today, the world’s major security risks stem from the wrath of societies or groups that feel alienated or left behind by the emerging liberal order.

Video,
Justin Vogt and Keith Gessen

Justin Vogt, deputy managing editor of Foreign Affairs, sits down with Keith Gessen, co-editor of n+1.

Essay, 2014
Alexander Lukin

U.S. and European officials need to understand how Russia really thinks about foreign policy. To resolve the Ukraine crisis and prevent similar ones from occurring in the future, they need to get better at putting themselves in Moscow’s shoes.

Essay, 2014
Robert Legvold

The crisis in Ukraine has pushed Moscow and the West into a new Cold War. For both sides, the top priority must now be to contain the conflict, ensuring that it ends up being as short and as shallow as possible.

Review Essay, 2014
Keith Gessen

Two recent books about Soviet history help answer questions raised by the ongoing crisis in Ukraine: What is wrong with Russia and why, despite two decades of optimistic predictions that it was on track to become a “normal” country, has it never become one?

Snapshot,
Yuri M. Zhukov

The battle over eastern Ukraine is more economic than ethnic -- and Kiev's window to address its root causes is closing fast. 

Snapshot,
Peter D. Feaver and Eric Lorber

The same attributes that make sanctions effective can also make them difficult to unwind. That poses a big problem: If Washington can't ease the pressure when states comply with its demands, it can't expect to achieve its most important goals.

Essay, 2014
Barry Blechman and Russell Rumbaugh

U.S. tactical nuclear weapons in Europe had little military value during the Cold War and they have even less today. Instead of giving these aging weapons a costly upgrade, Washington should begin phasing them out.

Snapshot,
Mitchell A. Orenstein and Péter Krekó

Earlier this week, as Europe was preparing for continent-wide parliamentary elections, Hungary was busy asking the EU Parliament to revoke diplomatic immunity for Béla Kovács, a prominent representative of Hungary’s far-right Jobbik party, in order to charge him with spying on the EU for Russia.

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