Russia & FSU

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Snapshot,
Jacob Stokes

While the world focuses on China’s aggression in the seas to its east, China’s leaders are looking west with their "One Belt, One Road" strategy. If successful, the ambitious program would make China a principal economic and diplomatic force in Eurasian integration.

Snapshot,
Thomas J. Reese and Daniel I. Mark

Moscow is applying its restrictive laws in Crimea. As a result, Muslims, Jews, and even some Orthodox Christian groups are facing increasing discrimination.

Snapshot,
Ilan Berman

Mixed martial arts has become a way for the increasingly isolated Russia to interact with the rest of the world. The message is clear: despite Western sanctions, Russia is still very much a global contender.

Snapshot,
Nicholas Waller

More than a decade after overt hostilities between Russia and Chechen separatists ended in the Caucasus, two old foes clash once again, this time in Ukraine.

Snapshot,
Alisher Ilkhamov and Jeff Goldstein

Uzbekistani President Islam Karimov may have won yet another fraudulent election, but challenges to his rule abound.

Snapshot,
Marlene Laruelle

Washington's latest sanctions have missed the mark. Targeting an ideologue such as Alexander Dugin will do little to punish Russia for its crimes against Ukraine.

Snapshot,
Gregory Feifer

Last December, an emotional defense of the Kremlin’s war in Ukraine began swirling around the Internet. Amid the volleys of opinion about Moscow’s actions, the provenance of this particular open letter stood out: its authors were descendants of some of the most powerful Russian aristocratic families that fled the country after the Bolshevik Revolution in 1917.

Snapshot,
Paul Stronski

Criminal and militant groups in eastern Ukraine, although formally united against the Ukrainian state, are mostly just interested in the spoils of war. The commanders of these groups have little incentive to build a peace that weakens their own power.

Snapshot,
Olena Lennon

The nationalistic ideology among some in the Ukrainian diaspora is fueling extreme sentiments both abroad and in their homeland.

Letter From,
Gregory Feifer

From Klaipeda to Vilnius, Lithuanians are preparing for the day that Russian President Vladimir Putin turns from Crimea and the civil war in eastern Ukraine toward them or their neighbors in Latvia and Estonia. Their jitters are understandable; every family in the Baltics has direct experience with Russian occupation.

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