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Video,

Foreign Affairs Editor Gideon Rose moderates a debate on the future of the global economy.

Comment, 2014
Ira Trivedi

Last December, India's Supreme Court re-established a colonial era law prohibiting homosexual relations. That will mix poorly with an Indian society that has a long tradition of tolerance for sexual minorities.

Letter From,
Dorn Townsend

For the past four years, Afghan television stations have been flooding the country’s airwaves with a steady stream of crime dramas and courtroom documentaries. Backed by foreign donors, the series have two benefits: they offer a valuable education in civil procedure and help develop popular expectations of equality before the law.

Review Essay, 2014
Minxin Pei

As the United States and China try to keep their relationship from exploding, one might think that leading technocratic experts in both countries would be a force for calm rather than conflict. A new collection of essays dispels any such hope.

Snapshot,
Milan Vaishnav

Heading into general elections this spring, Indian voters are worried about the economy -- no wonder, since the country's growth rate has fallen by nearly half since 2010, inflation remains high, and corruption is rampant. Unfortunately for voters, none of the leading parties have presented a coherent economic strategy.

Video,

Foreign Affairs Editor Gideon Rose moderates a discussion on the new emerging markets of Poland, South Korea, and Turkey.

Video,

Gideon Rose, editor of Foreign Affairs, interviews Tom Donilon, former U.S. national security adviser.

Snapshot,
Eduardo J. Gómez

By some measures, the BRICS have squandered their years of plenty. Even as they poured money into building dynamic economies and gaining global power, they neglected to invest in their own populations. Another group of nations -- Mexico, Colombia, and Singapore -- has struck a better balance and, as a result, makes a better model than the BRICS for other emerging economies.

Snapshot,
Alexander Kasterine

Wildlife trade bans are failing because they have run into the same basic problem as the war on drugs. Prohibitions on trading wildlife products such as tusks and timber have ultimately made them more valuable. And criminal organizations have moved in and taken over the market.

Snapshot,
Matt Mossman

For the world’s mining industry, the past few years have been turbulent. But those Wild West days might be coming to an end.

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