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Snapshot,
Vamsee Juluri

Whether Modi will usher in a Hindu renaissance, as his supporters hope, or contribute to the rise of Hindu nationalism, as his detractors warn, remains to be seen. For the moment, however, his words have been promising. 

Snapshot,
Jung-Chul Lee and Inwook Kim

Recent hacking aside, Pyongyang has been softening its tone for some time now—a possible sign that it is ready to return to the negotiating table.

Snapshot,
Eli Berman, Joseph H. Felter, Jacob N. Shapiro

Aid, investment, and job creation don't necessarily bring peace to conflict zones. In fact, aid often fuels violence. Policymakers need smarter development programs to minimize such unintended side effects.  

Snapshot,
Robert Muggah

Fragile cities—places where government authority is crumbling and violence runs deep—will be the world's greatest challenge in the coming decades. But turning such cities around is possible. Here's how. 

Snapshot,
Jeffrey W. Hornung

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s recent electoral victory gave him some leeway to finally address the issue of comfort women, which plagues Japan’s relations with South Korea.

Snapshot,
Amjad Mahmood Khan

Pakistan's terrorism problem has its roots in a group of draconian laws—known as the blasphemy laws—that a military dictator, Zia ul-Haq, enacted decades ago.

Snapshot,
Joseph Chinyong Liow

The siege in Australia serves as a reminder that even the strictest and most comprehensive antiterrorism laws cannot immunize a society from risk. That lesson is all the more salient for Southeast Asian countries, which have experienced since 2000 several high-profile terrorist attacks in public places.

Snapshot,
M.J. Akbar

Long before ISIS declared a caliphate in Iraq and Syria, Mahatma Gandhi gave Indian Muslims support for their Caliphate movement.

Video,
Justin Vogt and Anand Gopal

Anand Gopal, former Afghanistan correspondent for The Wall Street Journal, sits down with Justin Vogt, deputy managing editor of Foreign Affairs.

Snapshot,
Jacques E. C. Hymans

Many have warned that even if a Iran accepts a nuclear deal, it will continue to develop nuclear weapons in secret. In reality, however, Iran simply doesn't have the capability to build the bomb without getting caught.

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