Regions

Africa

Snapshot,
Geoff D. Porter

From conflict in Mali to Libya's dangerous morass, Algeria has never faced such serious threats directly on its own borders. For the moment, the country appears determined to follow its usual strategy of pushing for political solutions to the external crises while beefing up its internal security as a safeguard if these solutions fail. The problem with this strategy is that asks too much from ordinary Algerians, who can only hope that it’s the best way to protect the normalcy that they hold so dear.

Snapshot,
Daniel Bekele and Jeffrey Smith

Since the attempted coup in December, six Gambian soldiers, including the three sentenced to death, have been held in solitary confinement and denied contact with family members and proper access to lawyers. These reports are just the most recent reminder of the horrendous human rights situation in Gambia.

Snapshot,
Paul Hidalgo

Al Shabab has been pushed out of its strongholds and cut off from its financial lifelines. And that is why the group’s ability to so easily attack within Kenya is so puzzling. Kenyan leaders have long blamed Somalia-based fighters and the country’s minority Muslim population. But the truth is that the main culprits are the culture and policies of the government itself.

Americas

Essay, 2015
Jess Lowenberg-DeBoer

"Precision agriculture" is revolutionizing farming as we know it. Taking advantage of information technology, farmers can now collect precise data about their fields and customize how they cultivate each square foot, boosting yields and reducing waste. Big data is the key to the future of the green revolution.

Snapshot,
Timothy H. Edgar

Since 2013, when Edward Snowden revealed that the NSA had been spying on private communications on a mass scale, U.S. President Barack Obama has faced pressure to tighten privacy laws. The administration has made more progress than many think.

Snapshot,
Juan de Onis

Some argue that Chile is living through the worst political crisis since the 1973 overthrow of President Salvador Allende. That is certainly exaggerated. Chile’s democracy under Bachelet is not at risk. Even so, finding a solution to corruption will not be easy.

Asia

Comment, 2015
Gideon Rose

In recent decades, China has surged from totalitarian poverty to middle-income authoritarianism. This transformation has been one of the great events in human history. But Beijing has already picked most of the low-hanging fruit of modernization and is now bumping up against the classic challenges of the middle phases of development. Our deep dive into China's condition looks at what's happening today—and what might happen tomorrow.

Snapshot,
Jacob Stokes

While the world focuses on China’s aggression in the seas to its east, China’s leaders are looking west with their "One Belt, One Road" strategy. If successful, the ambitious program would make China a principal economic and diplomatic force in Eurasian integration.

Letter From,
Vasundhara Sirnate

Although they both want the same things—protection from counterterrorism gone awry and development—Jammu’s Hindu population and Muslim Kashmiris have different answers about how to get them. Modi's election laid these divisions bare.

Europe

Snapshot,
Timothy H. Edgar

Since 2013, when Edward Snowden revealed that the NSA had been spying on private communications on a mass scale, U.S. President Barack Obama has faced pressure to tighten privacy laws. The administration has made more progress than many think.

Snapshot,
Philip Cowley

Ahead of the British general election this spring, both Labour and the Conservatives are acting confident that they will win outright. Recent polling suggests otherwise.

Snapshot,
Aaron Stein

Although Turkey has sided with Saudi Arabia in Yemen, it won't be backing Riyadh in opposing the region's Shiite powers anytime soon. Rather, Ankara's strategy relies on carefully balancing Saudi Arabia and Iran.

Middle East

Snapshot,
Mohsen Milani

Saudi Arabia is grossly exaggerating Iran’s power in Yemen to justify its own expansionist ambitions. Iran is not the cause of the civil war, nor are the Houthis its proxy. Chaos, not Iran, controls the Arab world's poorest nation.

Snapshot,
Charles Schmitz

Many suspect former Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh of using the Houthis, his old enemies, to try to regain power. But in the end, he may end up as the conflict's biggest loser.

Snapshot,
Gideon Rose

Russia & FSU

Snapshot,
Jacob Stokes

While the world focuses on China’s aggression in the seas to its east, China’s leaders are looking west with their "One Belt, One Road" strategy. If successful, the ambitious program would make China a principal economic and diplomatic force in Eurasian integration.

Snapshot,
Thomas J. Reese and Daniel I. Mark

Moscow is applying its restrictive laws in Crimea. As a result, Muslims, Jews, and even some Orthodox Christian groups are facing increasing discrimination.

Snapshot,
Ilan Berman

Mixed martial arts has become a way for the increasingly isolated Russia to interact with the rest of the world. The message is clear: despite Western sanctions, Russia is still very much a global contender.

Global Commons

Snapshot,
Timothy H. Edgar

Since 2013, when Edward Snowden revealed that the NSA had been spying on private communications on a mass scale, U.S. President Barack Obama has faced pressure to tighten privacy laws. The administration has made more progress than many think.

Snapshot,
Bhaskar Chakravorti, Christopher Tunnard, and Ravi Shankar Chaturvedi

Estonia is the gold standard when it comes to digital innovation. The question is: How does the rest of the world catch up?

Snapshot,
Amrita Narlikar

Developed and developing countries use poverty as a bargaining tool. Here's how.