Regions

Africa

Snapshot,
Seth Kaplan

Life in Nigeria's largest city is changing for the better, offering a potential lesson for struggling states looking to stage a turnaround: mayors and city councils are more likely to embrace positive change than legislatures and presidents -- and far more quickly and effectively.

Interview, SEPT/OCT 2014
Jim Yong Kim

The World Bank's president talks to Foreign Affairs about fighting inequality, his reform program, and who should succeed him.

Snapshot,
Martin Welz and Angela Meyer

The history of the Central African Republic over the past 20 years is linked to a dizzying number of peacekeeping acronyms. The latest mission, to be led by the UN, seems fated to repeat mistakes of its predecessors.

Americas

Snapshot,
Gregory Clark

The United States cherishes an image of itself as a country that invites in the world’s tired, its poor, and its huddled masses. In reality, the country isn't capable of transforming the life opportunities of disadvantaged populations.

Snapshot,
Mary L. Dudziak

As the turmoil in Ferguson unfolds, questions about the United States' commitment to human rights are once more headlining news coverage around the world. That should not be surprising. American racial inequality regularly dominated foreign news coverage during the 1950s and 1960s. And U.S. policymakers were eventually forced to respond, in part to protect the United States' image abroad.

Comment, SEPT/OCT 2014
Michael Tomasky

Divisions among Democrats exist just like they do among Republicans, but have largely festered beneath the surface for lack of a spokesperson to challenge the party’s economic elites. In Elizabeth Warren, grassroots Democrats may have found their champion.

Asia

Snapshot,
Fumio Kishida

Next year marks the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, offering a unique opportunity to forward Japan's vision for a nuclear-free world.

Snapshot,
Ira Trivedi

In India, a sexual revolution is under way. Most often commented on are the changes it will bring for women -- an entire generation of educated women now has a say in marriage partners and life choices. But the definition of what it means to be a man in India is also changing, and one result of the turmoil is violence.

Response,
Agio Pereira

Over the years, more than a few armchair critics have prognosticated the demise of the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste, also known as East Timor. But the nation builders themselves can't indulge notions of failure.

Europe

Snapshot,
Soner Cagaptay

Davutoglu’s foreign policy has dangerously exposed Turkey to regional threats, which will probably preoccupy him as he takes over the prime ministership.

Comment, SEPT/OCT 2014
Yascha Mounk

The Tea Party and its European cousins have emerged from the enduring inability of democratic governments to satisfy their citizens’ needs. Today’s populist movements won’t subside until the legitimate grievances driving them have been addressed.

Essay, SEPT/OCT 2014
Mark Blyth and Eric Lonergan

Most economists agree that the global economy is stagnating and that governments need to stimulate growth, but lowering interest rates still further could spur a damaging cycle of booms and busts. Instead, central banks should hand consumers cash directly.

Middle East

Snapshot,
Mohsen Milani

It is not particularly surprising that the United States is on the verge of rapprochement with Iran. What is surprising, however, is how it's coming about -- not through negotiations over the fate of Tehran’s nuclear program, but as a result of the battle against ISIS.

Snapshot,
Adam Heffez and Noam Raydan

Most people who look at war-torn Syria can’t help but see the tragedy. But some are starting to treat Syria as something else entirely: an investment opportunity.

Snapshot,
Arthur Herman

Compared with the most sophisticated weapons systems in use today, tunnels have withstood the test of time. There’s no way to know how long drones or lasers or anti-missile defense systems will last, but as long as there is warfare, tunnels will almost certainly be part of the fight.

Russia & FSU

Snapshot,
Alexander J. Motyl

If Ukraine does manage to pacify the Donbas, it will be saddled with a devastated, unstable, and permanently insecure rust belt that will continue to do what it has done since independence in 1991: serve as a channel for Russian influence on Ukraine’s internal affairs and a home to political forces that oppose reform and integration with the West.

Snapshot,
Nate Schenkkan

The sanctions war between Russia and the West is hurting Russian consumers. But it is buoying the fortunes of several post-Soviet states hungry for Russian markets -- and advancing Putin's vision of a tighter Eurasian community. 

Essay, SEPT/OCT 2014
John J. Mearsheimer

Conventional wisdom in the West blames the Ukraine crisis on Russian aggression. But this account is wrong: Washington and its European allies actually share most of the responsibility, having spent decades pushing east into Russia’s natural sphere of interest.

Global Commons

Snapshot,
Joseph Chinyong Liow

The economic potential of the Arctic is undoubtedly considerable, and that has heightened Asian interest in the region. Because these are perilous times for the Arctic environment, though, the exploration (and exploitation) of the area needs to be done sustainably.

Essay, JUL/AUG 2014
Erik Brynjolfsson, Andrew McAfee, and Michael Spence

Machines are substituting for more types of human labor than ever before. This means that the real winners of the future will be neither the providers of cheap labor nor the owners of ordinary capital, but rather those who can innovate and create new products, services, and business models.

Essay, JUL/AUG 2014
Benn Steil

In today’s dollar-dominated financial system, changes in U.S. monetary policy can have immediate and significant global effects, wrecking economies and toppling regimes. As a result, for many countries monetary sovereignty is nothing but a dream.