Regions

Africa

Interview, Jan/Feb 2015
Mo Ibrahim

Mo Ibrahim, founder of Celtel, talks to Foreign Affairs about succeeding in the mobile sector, innovating in the developing world, and the future of governance in Africa.

Snapshot,
Kip Hale

In 2002, the International Criminal Court (ICC) came into being. At the time, observers were hopeful that rule of law could help constrain humanity’s worst impulses, a sentiment that, today, may seem foolhardy. Yet, where else would victims turn? Ruthless tyrants and their henchmen have killed, raped, and tortured innocents, and few, if any, international institutions have been able to stop them or provide justice after the fact.

Letter From,
Javier Alvarez

The Liberian government and international organizations have been most focused on containing Ebola, as they should be. The containment policies, however, have come with unintended economic consequences that need to be addressed to avert an even worse crisis.

Americas

Comment, Jan/Feb 2015
Gideon Rose

Entrepreneurs drive innovation and dynamism, which in turn drive growth. So our lead package explores entrepreneurialism today—what it involves, what it accomplishes, and what can be done to spur and profit from it.

Interview, Jan/Feb 2015
Jeff Bezos

Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon, talks to Foreign Affairs about American competitiveness, creative disruption, and why he runs into the office every morning.

Interview, Jan/Feb 2015
Michael Moritz

Venture capitalist Michael Moritz talks to Foreign Affairs about predicting success, investing globally, and why Google’s original business model was a failure.

Asia

Snapshot,
Joseph Chinyong Liow

The siege in Australia serves as a reminder that even the strictest and most comprehensive antiterrorism laws cannot immunize a society from risk. That lesson is all the more salient for Southeast Asian countries, which have experienced since 2000 several high-profile terrorist attacks in public places.

Snapshot,
M.J. Akbar

Long before ISIS declared a caliphate in Iraq and Syria, Mahatma Gandhi gave Indian Muslims support for their Caliphate movement.

Snapshot,
Jacques E. C. Hymans

Many have warned that even if a Iran accepts a nuclear deal, it will continue to develop nuclear weapons in secret. In reality, however, Iran simply doesn't have the capability to build the bomb without getting caught.

Europe

Interview, Jan/Feb 2015
Niklas Zennstrom

Niklas Zennstrom, founder of Skype, talks to Foreign Affairs about the sharing economy, why start-ups are thriving in Europe, and how technology can address climate change.

Snapshot,
Petr Polak

An energy union might give Europe more leverage over Russia’s gas monopoly, but it will also be difficult to implement without setting off a diplomatic energy battle between Poland and Germany.

Snapshot,
Arthur Goldhammer

Nicolas Sarkozy has just been elected head of UMP, the party he led before becoming president. Sarkozy hopes that the victory will give him a leg up in the battle to become France’s next president in 2017.

Middle East

Snapshot,
Jim Krane

The Gulf monarchies have developed a growing taste for their chief export, one that could undermine both of their long-held roles: as global suppliers and as stable polities in an otherwise fractious Middle East.

Snapshot,

We poll experts on whether they think the United States should significantly step up its military campaign against ISIS in Iraq and Syria.

Snapshot,
Shashank Joshi

The Gulf Cooperation Council recently announced the creation of a joint military command among its six member nations that will respond to regional threats. This news is not revolutionary: every effort at Gulf military unity has ended in failure, to a greater or lesser degree.

Russia & FSU

Snapshot,
Daniel Cloud

The ruble has already lost almost half its value against the dollar this year, and there is little doubt that Putin will end up badly wounded. The question is whether he will drag his country down with him, turning Russia into a full-fledged pariah state. 

Snapshot,
Petr Polak

An energy union might give Europe more leverage over Russia’s gas monopoly, but it will also be difficult to implement without setting off a diplomatic energy battle between Poland and Germany.

Snapshot,
Mitchell A. Orenstein and Bojan Bugaric

On November 16, when the Romanian people elected as president Klaus Iohannis, an ethnic German who ran a vigorous campaign against corruption, they shattered a number of illusions about politics in eastern Europe.

Global Commons

Snapshot,
Milosz Reterski

In defending its vital interests in the Arctic, the United States lacks a critical tool: mighty nuclear-powered icebreakers that would solidify its economic and strategic role in the region. Russia is surging ahead in this area, and the United States must catch up.   

Essay, Nov/Dec 2014
Richard N. Haass

With U.S. hegemony waning and no successor waiting to pick up the baton, the current international system will likely give way to a larger number of power centers acting with increasing autonomy. The post–Cold War order is unraveling, and it will be missed.

Snapshot,
Joseph Chinyong Liow

The economic potential of the Arctic is undoubtedly considerable, and that has heightened Asian interest in the region. Because these are perilous times for the Arctic environment, though, the exploration (and exploitation) of the area needs to be done sustainably.