Regions

Africa

Letter From,
Will McGrath

Earlier this month, embattled Lesotho Prime Minister Tom Thabane addressed a raucous crowd of supporters in the rural district of Mokhotlong. The trip was one of many in the final campaign push before the country’s upcoming special election, which was previously slated for 2017 and is now scheduled for February 28.

Comment, Mar/Apr 2015
James L. Gibson

Apartheid’s legacy of mistrust and prejudice has prevented South Africa from establishing a truly stable multiracial democracy. But increasing contact among the races and the emergence of a black middle class offer hope of reducing the role of race in national politics.

Snapshot,
Conor Seyle

Governments have traditionally combatted piracy with brute military force. More recently, however, states have opted for a different approach and seen surprising success.

Americas

Snapshot,
Kathryn Sikkink and Bridget Marchesi

In December 2014, Brazil’s National Truth Commission completed what may be Latin America’s last major investigation into human rights abuses during the twentieth century. The report names names and calls for prosecutions, but whether its findings will lead to justice for the victims remains an open question.

Snapshot,
Ali Wyne

The strategy behind the U.S. pivot to Asia has a missing link: a stronger role in Latin America.

Snapshot,
Humera Khan

Traditionally, countering violent extremism has been limited to military and government-led counterterrorism efforts that have ignored the crucial role of civil society in preventing radicalization.

Asia

Snapshot,
Ira Trivedi

India’s environmental crisis is not just endangering human lives, but is also holding back the country’s economy. For Narendra Modi, India’s prime minister, this story isn’t new.

Snapshot,
Stephen Hadley and Paul Haenle

U.S. leaders should not dismiss Chinese President Xi Jinping’s proposal to build a “new type of major-country relations” out of hand if Xi is willing to remove the proposition's references to core interests.

Snapshot,
Van Jackson

Russia tends to make diplomatic overtures to North Korea whenever relations between Moscow and Washington sour. With U.S. strategy in Asia hanging in the balance, though, the repercussions of a stronger Russian-North Korean partnership could be different than ever before.

Europe

Snapshot,
Aaron Stein

Turkey has long supported the terrorist group al-Nusra as a way to pressure the Assad regime. But there is no evidence to suggest that Turkey ever gave support to ISIS, once its leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, split from al-Nusra in 2013.

Snapshot,
Mitchell A. Orenstein, Péter Krekó, and Attila Juhász

When Hungary passed laws entitling Hungarians living abroad to Hungarian passports and then the right to vote in Hungarian elections, it fanned dangerous nationalistic flames and fueled fears of secessionist movements in Hungarian communities beyond the country’s border.

Snapshot,
Omar G. Encarnación

After the radical-left Syriza party came to power in Greece, attention has turned to Spain's Podemos—a leftist party gaining traction in the polls—that could matter even more for European austerity policies.

Middle East

Snapshot,
Lisa Goldman

Commentators are arguing about whether Netanyahu is damaging Israel’s security by alienating Obama. It seems unlikely that the White House will cut back on military aid or stop vetoing anti-Israel legislation at the UN.

Snapshot,
Geoffrey Howard

ISIS is no longer just an Iraq and Syria problem. For months now, the terrorist group has been pushing into Libya as well.

Snapshot,
Reza Marashi

To avoid another failed round of nuclear negotiations with Tehran, Washington must understand why Iran is at the negotiating table.

Russia & FSU

Essay,
Rolf Mützenich

Despite being misdefined by proponents and detractors alike, a new détente with Russia offers a way out of a political and military stalemate in the Ukraine crisis.

Snapshot,

We poll experts on whether they think the United States should arm Ukraine.

Snapshot,
Michael Kofman

The second Minsk ceasefire agreement had an inauspicious beginning. But hope remains. Much of frontline has calmed down, and the sides have started to exchanges prisoners. Although the recent agreement may not provide a final solution to the conflict, it has good prospects of freezing it.

Global Commons

Snapshot,
Milosz Reterski

In defending its vital interests in the Arctic, the United States lacks a critical tool: mighty nuclear-powered icebreakers that would solidify its economic and strategic role in the region. Russia is surging ahead in this area, and the United States must catch up.   

Essay, Nov/Dec 2014
Richard N. Haass

With U.S. hegemony waning and no successor waiting to pick up the baton, the current international system will likely give way to a larger number of power centers acting with increasing autonomy. The post–Cold War order is unraveling, and it will be missed.

Snapshot,
Joseph Chinyong Liow

The economic potential of the Arctic is undoubtedly considerable, and that has heightened Asian interest in the region. Because these are perilous times for the Arctic environment, though, the exploration (and exploitation) of the area needs to be done sustainably.