Asia and Pacific

Andrew J. Nathan

India’s economic reforms of the 1980s through the first decade of this century unleashed private enterprise, encouraged foreign investment, and expanded foreign trade. Kohli calls this economic strategy “pro-business” rather than “pro-market” because it coddles big firms.

Edited by Jagdish Bhagwati and Arvind Panagariya
Andrew J. Nathan

India’s economic reforms of the 1980s through the first decade of this century unleashed private enterprise, encouraged foreign investment, and expanded foreign trade. Kohli calls this economic strategy “pro-business” rather than “pro-market” because it coddles big firms. Bhagwati, Panagariya, and their contributors present an alternative view based on an analysis of survey and economic data. They show that poverty has fallen among even the most disadvantaged caste and tribal groups.

Andrew J. Nathan

The politicization of prosecutions for corruption in China makes official data untrustworthy, but Wedeman has still found plausible ways to assess different types of corruption and their frequency. Nee and Opper come at the question of business-government relations in China from a different angle, but their findings converge with Wedeman’s. Their main point is that the Chinese market economy was created not from above, by the state, but from below, by entrepreneurs.

Andrew J. Nathan

Only in Japan could post-office reform become the political fight of the decade, and this book explains why.

Andrew J. Nathan

Moon, a well-known scholar, served as an adviser to Kim Dae-jung, South Korea’s president from 1998 until 2003, and to Roh Moo-hyun, who held the presidency from 2003 until 2008. The two presidents tried to thaw relations with Pyongyang, build trust, and create conditions for gradual change in the North’s political and economic systems that might lead to coexistence and eventually to peaceful unification. Moon blames U.S. President George W. Bush for disrupting those efforts before they had a chance to build on what he claims were initial successes.

Thomas P. Bernstein

This fine book is based on extraordinary access to Soviet archives and on documents recently published in China and the West, shedding new light on some aspects of the Chinese leader’s life and career. Pantsov and Levine succeed in conveying a balanced image of Mao’s complex persona and revealing the contradictions in his beliefs and actions.