Political and Legal

G. John Ikenberry

In the aftermaths of the Napoleonic Wars and the two world wars, the Western great powers made repeated efforts to build a world order that would establish peace and protect their interests, organized around various types of international bodies. Mazower is interested in why they did this.

G. John Ikenberry

Kleinfeld brings together a good grasp of the scholarship on law and society with the sensibilities and hard-earned experience of a field practitioner. The result is essential reading for the foreign policy community.

G. John Ikenberry

Nothing has bedeviled U.S. foreign policy more since the end of the Cold War than how to deal with a collection of despotic, hostile, and dangerous middle-tier states, such as Iran and North Korea. In this lucid and thoughtful book, Litwak compares the performances of the George W. Bush and Obama administrations in handling such foes.

G. John Ikenberry

Kaplan makes his most thoughtful statement yet about the darker undercurrents that limit cooperation and progress: resource scarcity, historical memory, cultural and ethnic divisions, and geopolitical rivalry.