Western Europe

Andrew Moravcsik

Trilling traces the rise of the radical right in the United Kingdom and condemns establishment figures for not taking it more seriously. But a memoir by Collins, who spent years as a neo-Nazi and is now the director of Searchlight Educational Trust, a British foundation dedicated to fighting racism and fascism at the community level, inadvertently calls into question the idea that officials in the United Kingdom should ring alarm bells about nativist radicalism.

Andrew Moravcsik

Mourlon-Druol considers the 1979 creation of the European Monetary System, the predecessor of the eurozone. He argues that the earlier system was weaker than it seemed, because participating governments disagreed about economic priorities -- just as they do now. James picks up the story, explaining how European governments agreed to a large-scale monetary integration in 1991 and then enacted it a decade later. Both books add pieces to what is likely to be an important historiographical puzzle for some years to come.

Andrew Moravcsik

No diplomat could be more qualified than Wall to write an official history of how the United Kingdom become part of the EU. When it comes to explaining how British decisions were made, his account is balanced and copiously documented. Yet when he turns to the issue of why decisions were made, the story becomes murkier.

Andrew Moravcsik

Can European countries maintain their diverse social welfare institutions? To answer this question, the authors of this readable and insightful book move beyond simplistic pessimism about generous social welfare policies.