Topics

Economics

Interview, Jan/Feb 2015
Jeff Bezos

Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon, talks to Foreign Affairs about American competitiveness, creative disruption, and why he runs into the office every morning.

Interview, Jan/Feb 2015
Mo Ibrahim

Mo Ibrahim, founder of Celtel, talks to Foreign Affairs about succeeding in the mobile sector, innovating in the developing world, and the future of governance in Africa.

Interview, Jan/Feb 2015
Michael Moritz

Venture capitalist Michael Moritz talks to Foreign Affairs about predicting success, investing globally, and why Google’s original business model was a failure.

Environment

Snapshot,
Scott Moore

China and the United States were once the greatest barriers to a comprehensive global climate agreement. No longer: India is now the last stumbling block standing in the way. It's still possible, however, to get New Delhi on board. Washingtion just needs to offer the right incentives.

Postscript,
Carter Roberts

Earth Overshoot Day is the date on which humanity’s demand for natural resources exceeds the earth’s ability to renew them in a year. Last year, we hit that mark on August 20. This year, it comes one day earlier. For the remainder of 2014, in other words, we will be living beyond our planet’s means.

Snapshot,
Pete Ogden

Thanks to a newly proposed pollution rule, the United States is finally on its way toward meeting its Copenhagen emission reduction commitments. The move comes at the perfect time: At the end of next year, global leaders will convene in Paris to conclude the next major round of climate negotiations.

Security

Snapshot,
Joseph Chinyong Liow

The siege in Australia serves as a reminder that even the strictest and most comprehensive antiterrorism laws cannot immunize a society from risk. That lesson is all the more salient for Southeast Asian countries, which have experienced since 2000 several high-profile terrorist attacks in public places.

Snapshot,

We poll experts on whether they think the United States should significantly step up its military campaign against ISIS in Iraq and Syria.

Snapshot,
Shashank Joshi

The Gulf Cooperation Council recently announced the creation of a joint military command among its six member nations that will respond to regional threats. This news is not revolutionary: every effort at Gulf military unity has ended in failure, to a greater or lesser degree.

Law & Institutions

Snapshot,
Nimmi Gowrinathan

Most of the recent Senate report on the CIA’s use of torture after 9/11 is gruesomely detailed. But one thing is missing: the stories of the women who we know were in U.S. custody and may well have been subject to degrading treatment as well.

Snapshot,
Kip Hale

In 2002, the International Criminal Court (ICC) came into being. At the time, observers were hopeful that rule of law could help constrain humanity’s worst impulses, a sentiment that, today, may seem foolhardy. Yet, where else would victims turn? Ruthless tyrants and their henchmen have killed, raped, and tortured innocents, and few, if any, international institutions have been able to stop them or provide justice after the fact.

Snapshot,
Rory Miller

Tomorrow, the French National Assembly is set to vote on a resolution recognizing a Palestinian state. Although the act would be nonbinding, the vote is a referendum on whether France can follow through on its claim as the West's truest champion of the Palestinian cause.

Politics & Society

Snapshot,
M.J. Akbar

Long before ISIS declared a caliphate in Iraq and Syria, Mahatma Gandhi gave Indian Muslims support for their Caliphate movement.

Interview, Jan/Feb 2015
Niklas Zennstrom

Niklas Zennstrom, founder of Skype, talks to Foreign Affairs about the sharing economy, why start-ups are thriving in Europe, and how technology can address climate change.

Review Essay, Jan/Feb 2015
James Surowiecki

In recent decades, most innovation has come from a single sector (information technology) and a single place (Silicon Valley). Walter Isaacson’s The Innovators and Peter Thiel’s Zero to One shed light on how that happened and what drives innovation more generally.

U.S. Policy

Snapshot,

We poll experts on whether they think the United States should significantly step up its military campaign against ISIS in Iraq and Syria.

Snapshot,
Nimmi Gowrinathan

Most of the recent Senate report on the CIA’s use of torture after 9/11 is gruesomely detailed. But one thing is missing: the stories of the women who we know were in U.S. custody and may well have been subject to degrading treatment as well.

Snapshot,
Milosz Reterski

In defending its vital interests in the Arctic, the United States lacks a critical tool: mighty nuclear-powered icebreakers that would solidify its economic and strategic role in the region. Russia is surging ahead in this area, and the United States must catch up.