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Interview, Jan/Feb 2015
Jeff Bezos

Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon, talks to Foreign Affairs about American competitiveness, creative disruption, and why he runs into the office every morning.

Interview, Jan/Feb 2015
Mo Ibrahim

Mo Ibrahim, founder of Celtel, talks to Foreign Affairs about succeeding in the mobile sector, innovating in the developing world, and the future of governance in Africa.

Interview, Jan/Feb 2015
Michael Moritz

Venture capitalist Michael Moritz talks to Foreign Affairs about predicting success, investing globally, and why Google’s original business model was a failure.

Interview, Jan/Feb 2015
Niklas Zennstrom

Niklas Zennstrom, founder of Skype, talks to Foreign Affairs about the sharing economy, why start-ups are thriving in Europe, and how technology can address climate change.

Interview, Jan/Feb 2015
Marcelo Claure

Marcelo Claure, founder of BrightStar and CEO of Sprint, talks to Foreign Affairs about how to run a corporation like an entrepreneur and bringing soccer to the United States. 

Snapshot,
Joshua Eisenman

Beijing has become less open to foreign businesses, subjecting them to costly fines, denying their mergers, refusing their applications for licenses, and detaining and deporting their managers. And the market has responded: In August, foreign direct investment into China fell by 14 percent from the previous year, following a 17 percent drop in July.

Snapshot,
Mitchell A. Orenstein

Out to earn a dollar on the Russian natural resource trade, European nations such as the Netherlands have long kept smiling as the Kremlin has continued to humiliate them. But now the airline disaster, combined with Moscow’s attempts to cover up its role in the tragedy, will likely force Europe to get real about its eastern neighbor.

Essay, JUL/AUG 2014
Erik Brynjolfsson, Andrew McAfee, and Michael Spence

Machines are substituting for more types of human labor than ever before. This means that the real winners of the future will be neither the providers of cheap labor nor the owners of ordinary capital, but rather those who can innovate and create new products, services, and business models.

Snapshot,
Johan Lagerkvist

Although China's leaders are intent on liberating the country's economy, they have outlined no such liberalization for China’s restless civil society. That approach may come back to haunt them.

Snapshot,
Bhaskar Chakravorti, Jianwei Dong, Kate Fedosova

European corporations have an important competitive advantage in many emerging markets: a legacy of colonialism that provides cultural, linguistic, and political ties. The fact that the United States has no such legacy is a liability as U.S. firms try to catch up to their European competitors and seize new opportunities in the world’s fastest-growing economies.

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