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Snapshot,
Mitchell A. Orenstein

Out to earn a dollar on the Russian natural resource trade, European nations such as the Netherlands have long kept smiling as the Kremlin has continued to humiliate them. But now the airline disaster, combined with Moscow’s attempts to cover up its role in the tragedy, will likely force Europe to get real about its eastern neighbor.

Essay, JUL/AUG 2014
Erik Brynjolfsson, Andrew McAfee, and Michael Spence

Machines are substituting for more types of human labor than ever before. This means that the real winners of the future will be neither the providers of cheap labor nor the owners of ordinary capital, but rather those who can innovate and create new products, services, and business models.

Snapshot,
Johan Lagerkvist

Although China's leaders are intent on liberating the country's economy, they have outlined no such liberalization for China’s restless civil society. That approach may come back to haunt them.

Snapshot,
Bhaskar Chakravorti, Jianwei Dong, Kate Fedosova

European corporations have an important competitive advantage in many emerging markets: a legacy of colonialism that provides cultural, linguistic, and political ties. The fact that the United States has no such legacy is a liability as U.S. firms try to catch up to their European competitors and seize new opportunities in the world’s fastest-growing economies.

Snapshot,
Bhaskar Chakravorti and Gita R. Rao

Apart from some huge outliers, such as Yum! Brands and Coca-Cola, U.S. business have fallen far behind their competitors in other nations when it comes to tapping into developing markets. Here is how they can make up that lost ground -- and shore up the United States' economic future.

Comment, May/June 2013
Steven N. Kaplan

Much of the outrage over economic inequality in the United States has centered on the high compensation and lack of accountability that corporate executives supposedly enjoy -- allegedly the result of boards at public companies. The truth, however, is that American CEOs now earn less and get fired more than in the recent past.

Snapshot,
Tyson Barker

In the past, U.S. and European negotiators have tried and failed to create a unified transatlantic market. But the trade talks that President Obama announced this month have a much better chance of succeeding, thanks to a greater need for economic growth on both sides, the threat of China’s illiberal economic behavior, and the desire to give U.S.-European relations a new purpose.

Snapshot,
Ido Baum

The slew of recent high-profile graft cases in Israel makes it seem that Israeli politicians are more corrupt than others. Part of this can be chalked up to aggressive state prosecutors and an open media. But the problem is not simply one of public perception.

Snapshot,
Aviezer Tucker

Unconventional energy technologies, such as hydraulic fracturing, are here to stay. They have already produced a staggering glut of natural gas in the United States, and in the years ahead, they will reshape world politics, bringing wealth and power to those who master them and leaving the old petro-dictatorships behind.

Snapshot,
Martin Feldstein

If the United States avoids increasing government spending as a share of GDP, it could actually lower tax rates since, given the U.S. tax structure, revenue generated by income taxes rises faster than GDP. What the country really needs now is to broaden its tax base.

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