Economic Development

Refine By:
Snapshot,
Paul Vigna and Michael J. Casey

Cryptocurrencies could enable the often neglected developing world to tap into crucial banking services.

Postscript,
Salvatore Babones

It has been clear for a long time that China's rate of economic growth would eventually decelerate for a number of reasons.

Snapshot,
Jose W. Fernandez and Eric Lorber

Easing the U.S. embargo on Cuba will provide companies with immediate economic opportunities, so long as they are willing to bear the administrative and bureaucratic burdens of conducting business in a nation untouched by U.S. industry for 54 years.

Snapshot,
Matt Wheeler

The impeachment of former Thai Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra threatens to derail more than her political career; it also imperils the military regime’s effort to suppress political discord.

Snapshot,
Eric B. Schnurer

By launching an e-residency program, Estonia is leading the way to a new market—one in which states compete for customers just as businesses do.

Snapshot,
Eli Berman, Joseph H. Felter, Jacob N. Shapiro

Aid, investment, and job creation don't necessarily bring peace to conflict zones. In fact, aid often fuels violence. Policymakers need smarter development programs to minimize such unintended side effects.  

Snapshot,
Robert Muggah

Fragile cities—places where government authority is crumbling and violence runs deep—will be the world's greatest challenge in the coming decades. But turning such cities around is possible. Here's how. 

Snapshot,
Anton Barbashin

Russian President Vladimir Putin hopes that the new Eurasian Economic Union will reintegrate the former Soviet states. But the union is nothing more than an illusion—and an unconvincing one at that.

Snapshot,
Nate Schenkkan

What started off as a relatively simple customs union in early 2014 has been transformed by treaty into a single economic space. But expansion has come at the cost of the union’s coherence, and as Russia’s economy spirals into crisis, the prognosis for 2015 is dire.

Comment, Jan/Feb 2015
Mariana Mazzucato

Conventional wisdom says the state can best foster innovation by just getting out of the way. In fact, government has historically served not as a meddler in the private sector but as a key booster of it—and often a daring one, willing to take risks that businesses won’t.

Syndicate content