Monetary Issues

Refine By:
Essay, 2014
Benn Steil

In today’s dollar-dominated financial system, changes in U.S. monetary policy can have immediate and significant global effects, wrecking economies and toppling regimes. As a result, for many countries monetary sovereignty is nothing but a dream.

Snapshot,
Wojciech Kopczuk and Allison Schrager

There’s limited evidence that wealth inequality has actually worsened in the United States in the last 30 years. And, even if it does eventually get worse, imposing a tax on wealth is a terrible way to promote equality. It would actually benefit the super wealthy the most.

Snapshot,
Nate Schenkkan

Sanctions might not stop Russia's destabilization of Ukraine, but Western policymakers should embrace them for another reason: because they can put a nail in the coffin of the project that started the Ukraine crisis to begin with -- Eurasian integration.

Snapshot,
Evan A. Feigenbaum and Damien Ma

For its broader reform project to succeed, China needs a new “federalism” -- a realignment of central and local government power -- that can adapt to the conditions of a rapidly changing economy.

Review Essay, May/June 2014
Tyler Cowen

Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-first Century is a truly important book, a groundbreaking work of analysis of economic inequality. It is frequently brilliant, but also flawed, and its policy recommendations are wildly impractical.

Snapshot,
Tom Keatinge

Since 2011, FATF, the international body charged with developing policies to combat money laundering and terrorism financing, has had Turkey on its gray list of high-risk and non-cooperative jurisdictions. Here's why.

Snapshot,
Piotr Zalewski

Many market watchers were relieved when Turkey's central bank recently raised its lending rate. Turkey's prime minister was not one of them.

Snapshot,
Yuri Takhteyev and Mariana Mota Prado

Bitcoin presents regulating agencies with difficult questions: Should they try to control it? Can they? If that sounds familiar, it should. The world faced these same questions in the early days of the Internet. Whether Bitcoin is more like AOL or Google, of course, is yet to be seen. Still, how governments choose to respond to it could change global finance for good.

Snapshot,
Philip Shishkin

In just a few short years, Eugene Gourevitch has gone from Kyrgyzstan's premier financier and confidant of the ruling family, to wanted man, to FBI informant. His story shows just how business gets done in many corners of the post-Soviet world.

Essay, Nov/Dec 2013
Charles W. Calomiris and Stephen H. Haber

Conventional wisdom sees banking crises as apolitical, the result of unforeseen and extraordinary circumstances. In reality, the same politics that influence other aspects of society also help explain why some countries, such as the United States, suffer repeated banking crises, while others, such as Canada, avoid them altogether.

Syndicate content