Political Economy

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Snapshot,
Tarek Osman

As Arab governments become increasingly authoritarian, the region's middle classes will confront a choice: cast their lot with the ruling elites or stand up to the government and risk their social and economic standing. 

Essay, JUL/AUG 2014
Erica Chenoweth and Maria J. Stephan

Revolts against authoritarian regimes don’t always succeed -- but they’re more likely to if they embrace civil resistance rather than violence. Over the last century, nonviolent campaigns have been twice as likely to succeed as violent ones and they increase the chances that toppling a dictatorship will lead to peace and democracy.

Snapshot,
Arvind Panagariya

As the euphoria associated with Narendra Modi’s extraordinary victory gives way to the duties of the office, the new prime minister must start delivering on his economic promises. Here's how he can do it.

Snapshot,
Peter Martin and David Cohen

At times, Xi has appeared to be a reformer in the mold of Deng Xiaoping. At other times, he has appeared nostalgic for the revolutionary socialism of Mao Zedong. In truth, he is taking his cues from both.

Snapshot,
Wojciech Kopczuk and Allison Schrager

There’s limited evidence that wealth inequality has actually worsened in the United States in the last 30 years. And, even if it does eventually get worse, imposing a tax on wealth is a terrible way to promote equality. It would actually benefit the super wealthy the most.

Snapshot,
Nate Schenkkan

Sanctions might not stop Russia's destabilization of Ukraine, but Western policymakers should embrace them for another reason: because they can put a nail in the coffin of the project that started the Ukraine crisis to begin with -- Eurasian integration.

Snapshot,
Evan A. Feigenbaum and Damien Ma

For its broader reform project to succeed, China needs a new “federalism” -- a realignment of central and local government power -- that can adapt to the conditions of a rapidly changing economy.

Review Essay, May/June 2014
Tyler Cowen

Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-first Century is a truly important book, a groundbreaking work of analysis of economic inequality. It is frequently brilliant, but also flawed, and its policy recommendations are wildly impractical.

Snapshot,
Diane Coyle

The economy’s character -- and what citizens value -- is changing, and that the way we measure the economy will have to keep up. In particular, economists will have to grapple with three issues: complexity, driven by innovation; the increasing share in advanced economies of intangibles, such as online activities with no price; and sustainability.

Snapshot,
Yuri Takhteyev and Mariana Mota Prado

Bitcoin presents regulating agencies with difficult questions: Should they try to control it? Can they? If that sounds familiar, it should. The world faced these same questions in the early days of the Internet. Whether Bitcoin is more like AOL or Google, of course, is yet to be seen. Still, how governments choose to respond to it could change global finance for good.

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