Political Economy

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Snapshot,
Dan Steinbock

Beijing recently launched an estimated $160 billion deal, in which local governments’ risky debts will be replaced with low-interest municipal debt. The change heralded a huge shift in ongoing efforts by Chinese reformers to shore up the country's economy.

Snapshot,
Philippa Brant

Over the past few years, China's aid to Pacific Island countries has increased, but few understand the full amount of money Beijing has given to its neighbors. Here's where the money has gone.

Snapshot,
Vito Laterza and Patience Mususa

Zambia is managing a boom in its copper mining industry and is on the verge of repaying its international debts. Political uncertainty following President Michael Sata's death, however, could unravel the country's progress.

Snapshot,
Kassia Yanosek and David G. Victor

Low oil prices could force some oil and gas producers to stop drilling. But the price slump may also create a sizable opportunity for new oil exploration projects, such as deep-water oil and gas fields, which have long lead times and do not rely solely on today’s oil prices.

Snapshot,
Mark Blyth and Cornel Ban

Just as Julius Caesar crossed the Rubicon river, in spite of the warnings of the Roman Senate not to, so has Alex Tsipras, leader of the anti-austerity party, Syriza, decided to try to end austerity in Greece, in spite of Europe’s leaders saying he shouldn’t. Whether Tsipras will succeed is still unclear, but whatever happens, his victory represents a crucial turning point for Europe—a signal that time has run out on austerity policies.

Snapshot,
Nicholas Spiro

Fed policy is once again revealing which emerging markets have strengthened their defenses against a tightening in U.S. monetary policy and which remain vulnerable. For its part, Turkey is firmly in the latter camp.

Snapshot,
Matt Mossman

In recent years, Occupy Wall Street hasn’t been the only group worried about how the spoils of economic growth have been distributed. Governments worldwide increasingly share the sentiment: like the pinched middle classes, they feel that corporations are taking too much of the profits for themselves. Here's the OECD and G-20's plan to get them to pay more.

Snapshot,
Tarek Osman

As Arab governments become increasingly authoritarian, the region's middle classes will confront a choice: cast their lot with the ruling elites or stand up to the government and risk their social and economic standing. 

Essay, JUL/AUG 2014
Erica Chenoweth and Maria J. Stephan

Revolts against authoritarian regimes don’t always succeed -- but they’re more likely to if they embrace civil resistance rather than violence. Over the last century, nonviolent campaigns have been twice as likely to succeed as violent ones and they increase the chances that toppling a dictatorship will lead to peace and democracy.

Snapshot,
Arvind Panagariya

As the euphoria associated with Narendra Modi’s extraordinary victory gives way to the duties of the office, the new prime minister must start delivering on his economic promises. Here's how he can do it.

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