Sanctions

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Snapshot,
Eric Lorber and Elizabeth Rosenberg

U.S. policymakers are considering giving global companies a choice: stop providing long-term financing and energy assistance to major Russian companies or be kicked out of the U.S. financial system. Such measures resemble the sanctions the United States placed on Iran a couple of years ago. But Iran was a different problem. And treating Russia the same way would be a mistake.

Snapshot,
Ely Ratner and Elizabeth Rosenberg

The United States will have to face the reality that further Russian isolation might be more costly than it is worth. In particular, further U.S.-led sanctions will start to harm U.S. allies and partners in Asia and, therefore, American interests.

Snapshot,
J. Berkshire Miller

Before the year is out, the world could witness Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shaking hands with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Pyongyang.

Snapshot,
Stephen Holmes and Ivan Krastev

Russia's annexation of Crimea came with few consequences for Russia, while an accidental attack on a civilian airliner by semi-anarchical rebel forces, only loosely controlled by Moscow, may redefine the country's place in the world order. Here's why.

Snapshot,
Peter D. Feaver and Eric Lorber

The same attributes that make sanctions effective can also make them difficult to unwind. That poses a big problem: If Washington can't ease the pressure when states comply with its demands, it can't expect to achieve its most important goals.

Snapshot,
Tom Keatinge

Western leaders seek to force Putin to change course by threatening economic damage. But, fearing the economic blowback that sanctions may inflict on their own countries, they allow corporate self-interest to justify a weak and divided response. Those fears are misplaced.

Snapshot,
Robert Kahn

Although sanctions have a spotty record of achieving political objectives, they could be unusually powerful in Russia. The country's relationship to global financial markets -- integrated, highly leveraged, and opaque -- creates vulnerability, which sanctions could exploit to produce a Russian “Lehman moment”: a sharp, rapid deleveraging with major consequences for Russia’s ability to trade and invest.

Snapshot,
Tom Keatinge

Sanctions have not forced Russia to withdraw from Ukraine, and for that reason, some consider them a failure. In fact, they have worked just as intended, causing the ruble to weaken, inflation to rise, and investor demand for Russian stocks to dry up. They have also, apparently, pushed Putin into talks with the West.

Snapshot,
Lee S. Wolosky

Economic sanctions and visa bans seem like an appealing way to punish Putin, both because there aren’t any realistic military options for countering him and comprehensive economic sanctions have had remarkable success in recent years, including in Iran. Unfortunately, Iran-like sanctions are not politically feasible in this case, and half measures won't get the United States what it seeks.

Postscript,
Kimberly Ann Elliott
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