Sanctions

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Snapshot,
Robert Kahn

Although sanctions have a spotty record of achieving political objectives, they could be unusually powerful in Russia. The country's relationship to global financial markets -- integrated, highly leveraged, and opaque -- creates vulnerability, which sanctions could exploit to produce a Russian “Lehman moment”: a sharp, rapid deleveraging with major consequences for Russia’s ability to trade and invest.

Snapshot,
Tom Keatinge

Sanctions have not forced Russia to withdraw from Ukraine, and for that reason, some consider them a failure. In fact, they have worked just as intended, causing the ruble to weaken, inflation to rise, and investor demand for Russian stocks to dry up. They have also, apparently, pushed Putin into talks with the West.

Snapshot,
Lee S. Wolosky

Economic sanctions and visa bans seem like an appealing way to punish Putin, both because there aren’t any realistic military options for countering him and comprehensive economic sanctions have had remarkable success in recent years, including in Iran. Unfortunately, Iran-like sanctions are not politically feasible in this case, and half measures won't get the United States what it seeks.

Postscript,
Kimberly Ann Elliott
Postscript,
Patrick Clawson

As Rouhani mounts his charm offensive at the UN General Assembly, it is worth remembering that sanctions alone did not bring about Iran's new willingness to negotiate. Nor can they ensure that the mood will last.

Snapshot,
Zachary K. Goldman

The United States faces unprecedented threats in cyberspace. But in its efforts to mitigate them, Washington is neglecting one of its best tools: economic sanctions. Without delay, the Obama administration should start using sanctions to deter both foreign governments and nonstate actors from hacking into American computer systems.

Snapshot,
Patrick Clawson

Sanctions have succeeded in bringing Tehran back to the negotiating table, but they are a tactic, not a strategy. Any long-term policy has to aim for a democratic Iran.

Response, May/June 2012
Alexander Evans; Stephen D. Krasner

The United States has tried cracking down on Pakistan before. It did not work then, and it will not work now, writes Alexander Evans. The difference, counters Stephen Krasner, is that this time the United States has real leverage.

Snapshot,
Suzanne Maloney

The new sanctions regime places the United States' tactics and objectives -- a negotiated end to Iran's nuclear ambitions -- at odds. In effect, the administration has backed itself into a policy of regime change, an outcome it has little ability to influence.

Snapshot,
Mikael Eriksson and Francesco Giumelli

When violence first erupted in Syria, the EU responded carefully, using sanctions to target members of Assad's government in Damascus. Since, European officials have ditched those concerns and moved toward heavy, or comprehensive, sanctions. The problem is that they will hurt the Syrian people more than the regime.

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