Economics

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Snapshot,
Mitchell A. Orenstein

Out to earn a dollar on the Russian natural resource trade, European nations such as the Netherlands have long kept smiling as the Kremlin has continued to humiliate them. But now the airline disaster, combined with Moscow’s attempts to cover up its role in the tragedy, will likely force Europe to get real about its eastern neighbor.

Snapshot,
Johannes Haushofer

Poverty has psychological consequences, including stress, sadness, and anger, which may create a trap that keeps people mired in destitution. To make aid more effective, then, donors and policymakers should start considering whether their programs address mental as well as physical well-being.

Letter From,
Dorn Townsend

Afghanistan seems to be holding its breath. Business has ground to a halt and middle-class Afghans are eyeing foreign escape routes as they send their money out of the country. The sense of uncertainly is not just about who will be the next president, or whether the loser will accept the result. It’s about the precarious economy.

Snapshot,
Tom Keatinge
In recent years, U.S. and European officials have aggressively targeted terrorist financing networks. Those efforts have come at a high cost, restricting access to the financial system and pushing more cash into the shadows.

Snapshot,
Felix Salmon

There aren’t many institutions that are powerful enough to bring a sovereign nation to its knees. Most of the ones that are wield their power with great care; the rest are dangerous fundamentalists. Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court, suggested to the world that it -- and the rest of the U.S. federal judicial system -- lives squarely in the latter camp.

Essay, 2014
Erica Chenoweth and Maria J. Stephan

Revolts against authoritarian regimes don’t always succeed -- but they’re more likely to if they embrace civil resistance rather than violence. Over the last century, nonviolent campaigns have been twice as likely to succeed as violent ones and they increase the chances that toppling a dictatorship will lead to peace and democracy.

Essay, 2014
Richard Katz

Shinzo Abe is trying to restore Japanese consumer confidence by boosting inflation. But confidence must rest on something more substantive: meaningful structural reforms to reverse Japanese companies’ lagging competitiveness. Otherwise, any temporary economic boost will soon give way to disillusion.

Snapshot,
Yuri M. Zhukov

The battle over eastern Ukraine is more economic than ethnic -- and Kiev's window to address its root causes is closing fast. 

Snapshot,
Arvind Panagariya

As the euphoria associated with Narendra Modi’s extraordinary victory gives way to the duties of the office, the new prime minister must start delivering on his economic promises. Here's how he can do it.

Snapshot,
Peter D. Feaver and Eric Lorber

The same attributes that make sanctions effective can also make them difficult to unwind. That poses a big problem: If Washington can't ease the pressure when states comply with its demands, it can't expect to achieve its most important goals.

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