Economics

Refine By:
Snapshot,
Paul Gillis

In September, Alibaba Group launched the largest IPO in history, raising $25 billion from investors keen to own a slice of China’s most successful e-commerce company. For the moment, the potential for vast wealth overrode concerns about the unusual corporate structure and governance practices of Alibaba and firms like it. Maybe it shouldn’t have.

Snapshot,
Hugo Dixon

Europe's capital markets union is still a slogan in search of a policy program. But if it helps the continent develop new sources of finance, it could be hugely beneficial for all.

Snapshot,
J. P. Singh

Earlier this month, Brazil and the United States struck a landmark trade agreement over a longtime point of contention: cotton. The deal—the United States pays a hefty sum to Brazilian cotton farmers in return for an opportunity to continue subsidizing its own producers—concealed an ugly truth about the misbalance of power in international trade.

Snapshot,
Alexander Lebedev and Vladislav Inozemtsev

The world needs a new international convention to combat corruption -- a global epidemic that erodes government institutions, fuels unrest, and increasingly threatens the stability of the West.

Essay, Nov/Dec 2014
Andrei Shleifer and Daniel Treisman

Twenty-five years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, critics say postcommunist reforms have failed. But the evidence says otherwise. Transition states in Europe and Eurasia have become normal countries -- no worse, and sometimes better, than other states at comparable levels of development.

Snapshot,
Eric Lorber and Elizabeth Rosenberg

U.S. policymakers are considering giving global companies a choice: stop providing long-term financing and energy assistance to major Russian companies or be kicked out of the U.S. financial system. Such measures resemble the sanctions the United States placed on Iran a couple of years ago. But Iran was a different problem. And treating Russia the same way would be a mistake.

Snapshot,
Edoardo Campanella

As they struggle to save the continent’s common currency from ruin, European policymakers must also confront what could be an even bigger economic problem. Europe’s economy is on the brink of a catastrophic skills shortage.

Snapshot,
Nicholas Spiro

Fed policy is once again revealing which emerging markets have strengthened their defenses against a tightening in U.S. monetary policy and which remain vulnerable. For its part, Turkey is firmly in the latter camp.

Snapshot,
Alan Greenspan

In today's world of fiat currencies and floating exchange rates, a return to the gold standard seems to be nowhere on anybody’s horizon. Yet gold still has special properties that no other currency can claim -- which is why China is boosting its holdings.

Snapshot,
Joshua Eisenman

Beijing has become less open to foreign businesses, subjecting them to costly fines, denying their mergers, refusing their applications for licenses, and detaining and deporting their managers. And the market has responded: In August, foreign direct investment into China fell by 14 percent from the previous year, following a 17 percent drop in July.

Syndicate content